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An Australian study comparing the use of multiple-choice questionnaires with assignments as interim, summative law school assessment

Huang, Vicki 2017, An Australian study comparing the use of multiple-choice questionnaires with assignments as interim, summative law school assessment, Assessment and evaluation in higher education, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 580-595, doi: 10.1080/02602938.2016.1170761.

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Title An Australian study comparing the use of multiple-choice questionnaires with assignments as interim, summative law school assessment
Author(s) Huang, Vicki
Journal name Assessment and evaluation in higher education
Volume number 42
Issue number 4
Start page 580
End page 595
Total pages 16
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 0260-2938
1469-297X
Keyword(s) law
multiple-choice
assignment
Australia
Summary o the author’s knowledge, this is the first Australian study to empirically compare the use of a multiple-choice questionnaire (MCQ) with the use of a written assignment for interim, summative law school assessment. This study also surveyed the same student sample as to what types of assessments are preferred and why. In total, 182 undergraduate property law students participated in this study. Results showed that scores for the MCQ (assessing five topics) and assignment (assessing one topic) followed a similar distribution. This indicates that an MCQ does not necessarily skew students towards higher grades than an assignment. Results also showed significant but low correlations of test scores across instruments. When asked which instrument best assessed their knowledge of property law, students expressed a strong preference for an assignment over an MCQ or examination. Comments revealed a strong belief that, because lawyers write, law schools must assess legal writing – a skill not captured by MCQs. This study is important as many Australian law schools face increasing marking loads due to higher student numbers and compulsory mid-term assessments. This article endorses the use of MCQs but only as part of a diverse suite of law school assessment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/02602938.2016.1170761
Field of Research 130303 Education Assessment and Evaluation
1303 Specialist Studies In Education
1505 Marketing
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Informa UK
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086088

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Law
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