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Assessing the sustained impact of a school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent boys: the ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial

Lubans, David R., Smith, Jordan J., Plotnikoff, Ronald C., Dally, Kerry A., Okely, Anthony D., Salmon, Jo and Morgan, Philip J. 2016, Assessing the sustained impact of a school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent boys: the ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial, International journal of behavioural nutrition and physical activity, vol. 13, Article number : 92, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12966-016-0420-8.

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Title Assessing the sustained impact of a school-based obesity prevention program for adolescent boys: the ATLAS cluster randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Lubans, David R.
Smith, Jordan J.
Plotnikoff, Ronald C.
Dally, Kerry A.
Okely, Anthony D.
Salmon, Jo
Morgan, Philip J.
Journal name International journal of behavioural nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 13
Season Article number : 92
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Behavior
Disadvantaged
Fitness
Intervention
Resistance training
Adolescent
Body Mass Index
Child
Exercise
Faculty
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion
Humans
Male
Mobile Applications
Motivation
New South Wales
Parents
Pediatric Obesity
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Residence Characteristics
School Health Services
Schools
Sedentary Lifestyle
Sports
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
Summary BACKGROUND: Obesity prevention interventions targeting 'at-risk' adolescents are urgently needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the sustained impact of the 'Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time' (ATLAS) obesity prevention program. METHODS: Cluster RCT in 14 secondary schools in low-income communities of New South Wales, Australia. Participants were 361 adolescent boys (aged 12-14 years) 'at risk' of obesity. The intervention was based on Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory and involved: professional development, fitness equipment for schools, teacher-delivered physical activity sessions, lunch-time activity sessions, researcher-led seminars, a smartphone application, and parental strategies. Assessments for the primary (body mass index [BMI], waist circumference) and secondary outcomes were conducted at baseline, 8- (post-intervention) and 18-months (follow-up). Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle using linear mixed models. RESULTS: After 18-months, there were no intervention effects for BMI or waist circumference. Sustained effects were found for screen-time, resistance training skill competency, and motivational regulations for school sport. CONCLUSIONS: There were no clinically meaningful intervention effects for the adiposity outcomes. However, the intervention resulted in sustained effects for secondary outcomes. Interventions that more intensively target the home environment, as well as other socio-ecological determinants of obesity may be needed to prevent unhealthy weight gain in adolescents from low-income communities. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12612000978864.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0420-8
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086114

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Created: Tue, 13 Sep 2016, 13:16:53 EST

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