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Older adults' attitudes to food and nutrition: a qualitative study

Winter, J.E., McNaughton, S.A. and Nowson, C.A. 2016, Older adults' attitudes to food and nutrition: a qualitative study, The journal of aging research and clinical practice, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 114-119, doi: 10.14283/jarcp.2016.100.

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Title Older adults' attitudes to food and nutrition: a qualitative study
Author(s) Winter, J.E.
McNaughton, S.A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, S.A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Nowson, C.A.ORCID iD for Nowson, C.A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Journal name The journal of aging research and clinical practice
Volume number 5
Issue number 2
Start page 114
End page 119
Total pages 6
Publisher JARCP
Place of publication Auzeville-Tolosane, France
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 2258-8094
Keyword(s) elderly
attitudes
nutrition
interview
Summary Objective: To explore the factors that influence food choices of older adults and identify potential sources of dietary advice.

Design: A qualitative research design using semi-structured, one on one interviews.
Setting: A general medical practice in Victoria, Australia. Participants: Twelve community dwelling adults aged 75 to 89 (mean 82.8 ± 4.4) years, 92% living alone and 92% female.

Measurements: Interview questions addressed usual daily food pattern, shopping routines, appetite, importance of diet and potential sources of dietary advice or assistance.

Results: Thematic analysis identified key themes influencing food choices were maintaining independence; value of nutrition; childhood patterns; and health factors. Dietary restrictions and concerns with weight gain were expressed, and although these were managed independently, the GP was identified as the first source of information if required.

Conclusion: This sample of older adults placed high value on eating well as they age, however a number followed self-imposed dietary restrictions which have the potential to compromise their nutritional status as dietary requirements change. Further research is needed into how to communicate changing nutritional needs to this group.
Language eng
DOI 10.14283/jarcp.2016.100
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Journal of aging research and clinical practice
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086136

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.