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Mediating effects of dietary intake on associations of TV viewing, body mass index and metabolic syndrome in adolescents

Fletcher, E.A., McNaughton, S.A., Lacy, K.E., Dunstan, D.W., Carson, V. and Salmon, J. 2016, Mediating effects of dietary intake on associations of TV viewing, body mass index and metabolic syndrome in adolescents, Obesity science and practice, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 232-240, doi: 10.1002/osp4.60.

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Title Mediating effects of dietary intake on associations of TV viewing, body mass index and metabolic syndrome in adolescents
Author(s) Fletcher, E.A.ORCID iD for Fletcher, E.A. orcid.org/0000-0003-3958-9599
McNaughton, S.A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, S.A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Lacy, K.E.ORCID iD for Lacy, K.E. orcid.org/0000-0002-2982-4455
Dunstan, D.W.
Carson, V.
Salmon, J.ORCID iD for Salmon, J. orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Journal name Obesity science and practice
Volume number 2
Issue number 3
Start page 232
End page 240
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Hoboken, N.J.
Publication date 2016-09-19
ISSN 2055-2238
Keyword(s) BMI
dietary intake
metabolic syndrome
television
Summary OBJECTIVE: Evidence suggests that TV viewing is associated with body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in adolescents. However, it is unclear whether dietary intake mediates these relationships.

METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was conducted in adolescents (12-19 years) participating in the 2003-2006 United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. BMI z scores (zBMI) (n = 3,161) and MetS (n = 1,379) were calculated using age- and sex-specific criteria for adolescents. TV viewing (h/day) was measured via a self-reported questionnaire, and dietary intake was assessed using two 24-h recalls. Using the MacKinnon method, a series of mediation analyses were conducted examining five dietary mediators (total energy intake, fruit and vegetable intake, discretionary snacks, sugar-sweetened beverages and diet quality) of the relationships between TV viewing and zBMI and MetS.

RESULTS: Small positive relationships were observed between TV viewing and zBMI (β = 0.99, p < 0.001) and TV viewing and MetS (OR = 1.18, p = 0.046). No dietary element appeared to mediate the relationship between TV viewing and zBMI. However, sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and fruit and vegetable intake partially mediated the relationship between TV viewing and MetS, explaining 8.7% and 4.1% of the relationship, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the complexity of the relationships between TV viewing, dietary intake and cardiometabolic health outcomes, and that TV viewing should remain a target for interventions.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/osp4.60
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC CRE 1057608
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086137

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.