You are not logged in.

Listerine – for the bridesmaid who’s never a bride: disparaging humour increases brand attitude and recall among the powerless

Newton, Joshua D., Wong, Jimmy and Newton, Fiona Joy 2016, Listerine – for the bridesmaid who’s never a bride: disparaging humour increases brand attitude and recall among the powerless, European journal of marketing, vol. 50, no. 7/8, pp. 1137-1158, doi: 10.1108/EJM-06-2015-0321.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Listerine – for the bridesmaid who’s never a bride: disparaging humour increases brand attitude and recall among the powerless
Author(s) Newton, Joshua D.ORCID iD for Newton, Joshua D. orcid.org/0000-0002-7892-361X
Wong, Jimmy
Newton, Fiona Joy
Journal name European journal of marketing
Volume number 50
Issue number 7/8
Start page 1137
End page 1158
Total pages 22
Publisher Emerald
Place of publication Bingley, Eng.
Publication date 2016-07-11
ISSN 0309-0566
1758-7123
Keyword(s) power
advertising
humour
brand attitude
recall
Summary Purpose: While the potential benefits of integrating humour into advertisements are widely understood, the reasons why these effects emerge are not. Drawing on literature about the impact of psychological feelings of power, this research aims to examine how power motivation interacts with the presence of disparaging humour in ads to influence ad-related outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach: Following the measurement (Study 1) or manipulation (Study 2) of power motivation, participants viewed an ad featuring either disparaging humour or one of the following alternatives: no humour (Study 1) or non-disparaging humour (Study 2). Sense of superiority, brand attitude, ad claim recall and the perceived humorousness of the ad were then assessed.

Findings: Featuring disparaging humour in an ad increased participants’ sense of superiority, but only among those with high power motivation. Among such participants, this heightened sense of superiority increased the perceived humorousness of the disparaging humour (Studies 1 and 2), induced more favourable attitudes towards the brand featured in the ad (Studies 1 and 2) and enhanced ad claim recall (Study 2). These effects did not, however, extend to ads featuring non-disparaging humour (Study 2), indicating that it was the presence of disparaging humour, and not humour per se, that was responsible for these effects.

Originality/value: These findings break open the “black box” of humour by identifying why consumers perceive disparaging humorous content to be funny, when this effect will occur and what impact this will have on advertising-related outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/EJM-06-2015-0321
Field of Research 150502 Marketing Communications
Socio Economic Objective 910403 Marketing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Emerald Group Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086163

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Department of Marketing
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 63 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 16 Sep 2016, 14:43:25 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.