You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds

Maslo, Brooke, Schlacher, Thomas A., Weston, Michael, Huijbers, Chantal M., Anderson, Chris, Gilby, Ben L., Olds, Andrew D., Connelly, Rod M. and Schoeman, David S. 2016, Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds, PeerJ, Article number: e2460, pp. 1-23, doi: 10.7717/peerj.2460.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
weston-regionaldrivers-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 6.24MB 3

Title Regional drivers of clutch loss reveal important trade-offs for beach-nesting birds
Author(s) Maslo, Brooke
Schlacher, Thomas A.
Weston, MichaelORCID iD for Weston, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-8717-0410
Huijbers, Chantal M.
Anderson, Chris
Gilby, Ben L.
Olds, Andrew D.
Connelly, Rod M.
Schoeman, David S.
Journal name PeerJ
Season Article number: e2460
Start page 1
End page 23
Total pages 23
Publisher PeerJ
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-09-13
ISSN 2167-8359
Keyword(s) shorebirds
sandy shore
egg loss
predators
flood
seascape
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Seascap
EXPOSED SANDY BEACHES
COAST PIPING PLOVERS
DAILY SURVIVAL RATE
PREDATION RISK
REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS
SITE SELECTION
THINORNIS-RUBRICOLLIS
MULTIMODEL INFERENCE
POPULATION DECLINES
ECOLOGICAL FUNCTION
Summary Coastal birds are critical ecosystem constituents on sandy shores, yet are threatened by depressed reproductive success resulting from direct and indirect anthropogenic and natural pressures. Few studies examine clutch fate across the wide range of environments experienced by birds; instead, most focus at the small site scale. We examine survival of model shorebird clutches as an index of true clutch survival at a regional scale (∼200 km), encompassing a variety of geomorphologies, predator communities, and human use regimes in southeast Queensland, Australia. Of the 132 model nests deployed and monitored with cameras, 45 (34%) survived the experimental exposure period. Thirty-five (27%) were lost to flooding, 32 (24%) were depredated, nine (7%) buried by sand, seven (5%) destroyed by people, three (2%) failed by unknown causes, and one (1%) was destroyed by a dog. Clutch fate differed substantially among regions, particularly with respect to losses from flooding and predation. ‘Topographic’ exposure was the main driver of mortality of nests placed close to the drift line near the base of dunes, which were lost to waves (particularly during storms) and to a lesser extent depredation. Predators determined the fate of clutches not lost to waves, with the depredation probability largely influenced by region. Depredation probability declined as nests were backed by higher dunes and were placed closer to vegetation. This study emphasizes the scale at which clutch fate and survival varies within a regional context, the prominence of corvids as egg predators, the significant role of flooding as a source of nest loss, and the multiple trade-offs faced by beach-nesting birds and those that manage them.
Language eng
DOI 10.7717/peerj.2460
Field of Research 050211 Wildlife and Habitat Management
Socio Economic Objective 960802 Coastal and Estuarine Flora
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086169

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 68 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sun, 18 Sep 2016, 14:48:36 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.