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Family centred care before and during life-sustaining treatment withdrawal in intensive care: a survey of information provided to families by Australasian critical care nurses

Ranse, Kristen, Bloomer, Melissa, Coombs, Maureen and Endacott, Ruth 2016, Family centred care before and during life-sustaining treatment withdrawal in intensive care: a survey of information provided to families by Australasian critical care nurses, Australian critical care, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 210-216, doi: 10.1016/j.aucc.2016.08.006.

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Title Family centred care before and during life-sustaining treatment withdrawal in intensive care: a survey of information provided to families by Australasian critical care nurses
Author(s) Ranse, Kristen
Bloomer, MelissaORCID iD for Bloomer, Melissa orcid.org/0000-0003-1170-3951
Coombs, Maureen
Endacott, Ruth
Journal name Australian critical care
Volume number 29
Issue number 4
Start page 210
End page 216
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-11
ISSN 1036-7314
1878-1721
Keyword(s) communication
critical care
end of life care
family centred care
intensive care
nurse
survey
withdrawal of treatment
Summary BACKGROUND: A core component of family-centred nursing care during the provision of end-of-life care in intensive care settings is information sharing with families. Yet little is known about information provided in these circumstances.

OBJECTIVE: To identify information most frequently given by critical care nurses to families in preparation for and during withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment.

DESIGN: An online cross-sectional survey.

METHODS: During May 2015, critical care nurses in Australia and New Zealand were invited to complete the Preparing Families for Treatment Withdrawal questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics to identify areas of information most and least frequently shared with families. Cross tabulations with demographic data were used to explore any associations in the data.

RESULTS: From the responses of 159 critical care nurses, information related to the emotional care and support of the family was most frequently provided to families in preparation for and during withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment. Variation was noted in the frequency of provision of information across body systems and their associated physical changes during the dying process. Significant associations (p<0.05) were identified between the variables gender, nursing experience and critical care experiences and some of the information items most and least frequently provided.

CONCLUSIONS: The provision of information during end-of-life care reflects a family-centred care approach by critical care nurses with information pertaining to emotional care and support of the family paramount. The findings of this study provide a useful framework for the development of interventions to improve practice and support nurses in communicating with families at this time.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.aucc.2016.08.006
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
1110 Nursing
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Australian College of Critical Care Nurses
Free to Read? No
Free to Read Start Date 2018-11-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086185

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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