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Understanding the bereavement care roles of nurses within acute care: a systematic review

Raymond, Anita, Lee, Susan and Bloomer, Melissa J. 2016, Understanding the bereavement care roles of nurses within acute care: a systematic review, Journal of clinical nursing, In Press, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.1111/jocn.13503.

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Title Understanding the bereavement care roles of nurses within acute care: a systematic review
Author(s) Raymond, Anita
Lee, Susan
Bloomer, Melissa J.ORCID iD for Bloomer, Melissa J. orcid.org/0000-0003-1170-3951
Journal name Journal of clinical nursing
Season In Press
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-08-09
ISSN 1365-2702
Keyword(s) Bereavement
Death
Grief
Nurses
acute care
hospital
inpatient
Summary AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate nurses' roles and responsibilities in providing bereavement care during the care of dying patients within acute care hospitals.

BACKGROUND: Bereavement within acute care hospitals is often sudden, unexpected and managed by nurses who may have limited access to experts. Nurses' roles and experience in the provision of bereavement care can have a significant influence on the subsequent bereavement process for families. Identifying the roles and responsibilities nurses have in bereavement care will enhance bereavement supports within acute care environments.

DESIGN: Methods: A mixed-methods systematic review was conducted utilising the databases Cumulative Index Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL Plus), Embase, Ovid MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CareSearch and Google Scholar. Included studies published between 2006 to 2015, identified nurse participants, and the studies were conducted in acute care hospitals. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria and the research results were extracted and subjected to thematic synthesis.

RESULTS: Nurses' role in bereavement care included patient-centred care, family-centred care, advocacy and professional development. Concerns about bereavement roles included competing clinical workload demands, limitations of physical environments in acute care hospitals and, the need for further education in bereavement care.

CONCLUSIONS: Further research is needed to enable more detailed clarification of the roles nurse undertake in bereavement care in acute care hospitals. There is also a need to evaluate the effectiveness of these nursing roles and how these provisions impact on the bereavement process of patients and families. 

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The care provided by acute care nurses to patients and families during end-of-life care is crucial to bereavement. The bereavement roles nurses undertake is not well understood with limited evidence of how these roles are measured. Further education in bereavement care is needed for acute care nurses. 
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jocn.13503
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
111707 Family Care
1110 Nursing
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920202 Carer Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Wiley-Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086186

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Created: Tue, 20 Sep 2016, 11:05:54 EST

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