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Quantitation of ascorbic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals distinct differences between organs and growth phases

Kka, Noura, Rookes, James and Cahill, David 2017, Quantitation of ascorbic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals distinct differences between organs and growth phases, Plant growth regulation, vol. 81, no. 2, pp. 283-292, doi: 10.1007/s10725-016-0205-8.

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Title Quantitation of ascorbic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals distinct differences between organs and growth phases
Formatted title  Quantitation of ascorbic acid in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals distinct differences between organs and growth phases
Author(s) Kka, NouraORCID iD for Kka, Noura orcid.org/0000-0002-4329-3291
Rookes, JamesORCID iD for Rookes, James orcid.org/0000-0003-1479-2339
Cahill, DavidORCID iD for Cahill, David orcid.org/0000-0002-2556-0528
Journal name Plant growth regulation
Volume number 81
Issue number 2
Start page 283
End page 292
Total pages 10
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Dordrecht, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-03
ISSN 1573-5087
Keyword(s) Arabidopsis thaliana
ascorbic acid
d-isoascorbic acid
indole acetic acid
alicylic acid
Summary Optimal plant growth is the result of the interaction of a complex network of plant hormones and environmental signals. Ascorbic acid (AsA) is a crucial antioxidant in plants and is involved in the regulation of cell division, cell expansion, photosynthesis and hormone biosynthesis. Quantitative analysis of AsA in Arabidopsis thaliana organs was conducted using HPLC with d -isoascorbic acid (Iso-AsA) as an internal standard. Analysis revealed Àuctuations in the levels of AsA in different organs and growth phases when plants were grown under standard conditions. AsA concentrations increased in leaves in direct proportion to leaf size and age. Young siliques (seed set stage) and Àowering buds (open and unopened) showed the highest levels of AsA. A relationship was found between the level of AsA and indole acetic acid (IAA) in leaves, stems, Àowers, and siliques and the highest level of IAA and AsAwere found in the Àowers. In contrast, the lowest level of the plant hormone, salicylic acid, was found in the Àowers and the highest quantity measured in the leaves. Consequently, AsA has been found to be a multifunctional molecule that is involved as a key regulator of plant growth and development.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10725-016-0205-8
Field of Research 060703 Plant Developmental and Reproductive Biology
060705 Plant Physiology
0607 Plant Biology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer Science + Business Media Dordrecht
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086243

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.