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Randomised controlled trial of a digitally assisted low intensity intervention to promote personal recovery in persisting psychosis: SMART-Therapy study protocol

Thomas, Neil, Farhall, John, Foley, Fiona, Rossell, Susan L., Castle, David, Ladd, Emma, Meyer, Denny, Mihalopoulos, Cathrine, Leitan, Nuwan, Nunan, Cassy, Frankish, Rosalie, Smark, Tara, Farnan, Sue, McLeod, Bronte, Sterling, Leon, Murray, Greg, Fossey, Ellie, Brophy, Lisa and Kyrios, Michael 2016, Randomised controlled trial of a digitally assisted low intensity intervention to promote personal recovery in persisting psychosis: SMART-Therapy study protocol, BMC psychiatry, vol. 16, Article Number : 312, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12888-016-1024-1.

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Title Randomised controlled trial of a digitally assisted low intensity intervention to promote personal recovery in persisting psychosis: SMART-Therapy study protocol
Author(s) Thomas, Neil
Farhall, John
Foley, Fiona
Rossell, Susan L.
Castle, David
Ladd, Emma
Meyer, Denny
Mihalopoulos, CathrineORCID iD for Mihalopoulos, Cathrine orcid.org/0000-0002-7127-9462
Leitan, Nuwan
Nunan, Cassy
Frankish, Rosalie
Smark, Tara
Farnan, Sue
McLeod, Bronte
Sterling, Leon
Murray, Greg
Fossey, Ellie
Brophy, Lisa
Kyrios, Michael
Journal name BMC psychiatry
Volume number 16
Season Article Number : 312
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-09-07
ISSN 1471-244X
Keyword(s) Digital health
Illness self-management
Peer support
Personal recovery
Psychosis
Randomised controlled trial (RCT)
Schizophrenia
Tablet computers
e-therapy
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Psychiatry
COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
MENTAL-HEALTH-SERVICES
SOCIAL MEDIA
PSYCHOMETRIC EVALUATION
SELF-EFFICACY
ILLNESS
PEOPLE
STIGMA
Summary BACKGROUND: Psychosocial interventions have an important role in promoting recovery in people with persisting psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. Readily available, digital technology provides a means of developing therapeutic resources for use together by practitioners and mental health service users. As part of the Self-Management and Recovery Technology (SMART) research program, we have developed an online resource providing materials on illness self-management and personal recovery based on the Connectedness-Hope-Identity-Meaning-Empowerment (CHIME) framework. Content is communicated using videos featuring persons with lived experience of psychosis discussing how they have navigated issues in their own recovery. This was developed to be suitable for use on a tablet computer during sessions with a mental health worker to promote discussion about recovery.

METHODS/DESIGN: This is a rater-blinded randomised controlled trial comparing a low intensity recovery intervention of eight one-to-one face-to-face sessions with a mental health worker using the SMART website alongside routine care, versus an eight-session comparison condition, befriending. The recruitment target is 148 participants with a schizophrenia-related disorder or mood disorder with a history of psychosis, recruited from mental health services in Victoria, Australia. Following baseline assessment, participants are randomised to intervention, and complete follow up assessments at 3, 6 and 9 months post-baseline. The primary outcome is personal recovery measured using the Process of Recovery Questionnaire (QPR). Secondary outcomes include positive and negative symptoms assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, subjective experiences of psychosis, emotional symptoms, quality of life and resource use. Mechanisms of change via effects on self-stigma and self-efficacy will be examined.

DISCUSSION: This protocol describes a novel intervention which tests new therapeutic methods including in-session tablet computer use and video-based peer modelling. It also informs a possible low intensity intervention model potentially viable for delivery across the mental health workforce.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-1024-1
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
140208 Health Economics
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086353

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Created: Mon, 05 Dec 2016, 14:31:44 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.