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Investigating differences between drugs used in the Australian night-time economy: demographics, substance use, and harm

Pennay, Amy, Jenkinson, Rebecca, Quinn, Brendan, Droste, Nicolas Tom, Peacock, Amy, Lubman, Daniel Ian and Miller, Peter G. 2017, Investigating differences between drugs used in the Australian night-time economy: demographics, substance use, and harm, Substance use & misuse, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 71-81, doi: 10.1080/10826084.2016.1214153.

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Title Investigating differences between drugs used in the Australian night-time economy: demographics, substance use, and harm
Author(s) Pennay, Amy
Jenkinson, Rebecca
Quinn, Brendan
Droste, Nicolas Tom
Peacock, Amy
Lubman, Daniel Ian
Miller, Peter G.
Journal name Substance use & misuse
Volume number 52
Issue number 1
Start page 71
End page 81
Total pages 11
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1082-6084
1532-2491
Keyword(s) Australia
night-time economy
ecstasy
methamphetamine
cocaine
cannabis
Summary BACKGROUND: Understanding the characteristics of drug users in the night-time economy (NTE), and whether particular drugs are associated with risky practices and experience of harm, is necessary to inform targeted policy responses in this context.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the correlates of drugs used in the Australian NTE relating to demographics, alcohol use, and experience of harm. METHODS: Patrons were interviewed in the NTE of five Australian cities in 2012-2013 (n = 7,028; 61.9% male, median age 22 years). A custom designed survey gathered demographic data, alcohol, and substance use on the current night, and experience of harm in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Multivariate logistic regression analyses examined the correlates of drug use.

RESULTS: Ecstasy was most commonly reported (4.0%), followed by cannabis (2.9%), methamphetamine (2.6%), and cocaine (1.6%). Ecstasy users were more likely to be younger and report energy drink consumption. Cannabis users were more likely to be male, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries and sexual aggression in/around licensed venues in the past 3 months. Methamphetamine users were more likely to have been interviewed later, and to have engaged in pre-drinking. Cocaine users were more likely to be male, aged 21 years or more, have a blood alcohol concentration of greater than 0.10%, and to have been involved in intoxication-related accidents/injuries in the past three months.

Conclusions/Importance: We identified significant differences between types of drug users and the harms they experience, underscoring the need to develop innovative harm reduction policies in the NTE rather than blanket population-based approaches.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/10826084.2016.1214153
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920414 Substance Abuse
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Taylor & Francis Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086363

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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