Eating the landscape: aesthetic foodscape design and its role in Australian landscape architecture

Zeunert, Joshua 2011, Eating the landscape: aesthetic foodscape design and its role in Australian landscape architecture, in AILA 2011 : Papers from the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects National Conference, [Australian Institute of Landscape Architects], [Braddon, A.C.T.], pp. 1-34.

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Title Eating the landscape: aesthetic foodscape design and its role in Australian landscape architecture
Author(s) Zeunert, Joshua
Conference name Australian Institute of Landscape Architects. National Conference (2011 : Brisbane, Queensland)
Conference location Brisbane, Queensland
Conference dates 11 - 13 Aug. 2011
Title of proceedings AILA 2011 : Papers from the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects National Conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2011
Series Australian Institute of Landscape Architects National Conference
Start page 1
End page 34
Total pages 34
Publisher [Australian Institute of Landscape Architects]
Place of publication [Braddon, A.C.T.]
Keyword(s) design
aesthetic
edible
landscape
Australia
Summary This paper explores the relevance of 'Aesthetic Foodscape Design' (AFD) to current and future social and environmental challenges and argues for its integration into Australian landscape architectural design practice. It focuses on contemporary research into the fields of AFD and sustainability, AFD's potential role, challenges to AFD's realisation and current project work. AFD aims to contribute to overcoming the urban disconnection from growing food and also to increase awareness of food production and systems. AFD seeks to create edible landscapes in highly visible public and civic locations and encourage ongoing participation in the growing and sharing of food. AFD sets out to embed edible plant species in the core planning palette of landscape architects and designers. It calls for design and spatial exploration of edible plant species in landscape architectural practice. Ultimately, AFD endeavours to create aesthetic, edible, public spaces that delight users. This paper is intended as a general introduction to raise many of the relevant challenges to implementation of AFD encompassing aesthetics, risk, knowledge, process and maintenance. AFD, if successfully realised, provides potential environmental, social, economic and health benefits to participants and to the wider sphere. This paper aims to briefly capture a divergent range of areas and does not cover the aforementioned areas in detail but rather presents a general introduction in an Australian urban design context.
Language eng
Field of Research 120504 Land Use and Environmental Planning
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E2.1 Full written paper - non-refereed / Abstract reviewed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2011, Joshua Zeunert
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086411

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