You are not logged in.

Engagement in retirement: an evaluation of the effect of Active Mentoring on engagement of older adults with intellectual disability in mainstream community groups

Chng, J. P. L., Stancliffe, R. J., Wilson, N. J. and Anderson, Kate 2013, Engagement in retirement: an evaluation of the effect of Active Mentoring on engagement of older adults with intellectual disability in mainstream community groups, Journal of intellectual disability research, vol. 57, no. 12, pp. 1130-1142, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2788.2012.01625.x.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Engagement in retirement: an evaluation of the effect of Active Mentoring on engagement of older adults with intellectual disability in mainstream community groups
Author(s) Chng, J. P. L.
Stancliffe, R. J.
Wilson, N. J.
Anderson, KateORCID iD for Anderson, Kate orcid.org/0000-0003-2747-0865
Journal name Journal of intellectual disability research
Volume number 57
Issue number 12
Start page 1130
End page 1142
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2013-12
ISSN 0964-2633
1365-2788
Keyword(s) Active Mentoring
active support
engagement
intellectual disability
retirement
social inclusion
Summary Background: As adults with intellectual disability age, retirement options need to be explored. One option is to attend a mainstream community group for retirees. Support within these groups could come from group members who are trained to act as mentors for the older adults with intellectual disability. This research evaluated a support training programme, Active Mentoring, which combines elements of Active Support and Co-worker Training.

Method: Three older women with intellectual disability participated in a non-concurrent multiple baseline design. Effect size analyses (Percentage of Non-overlapping Data) were used to evaluate observational data.

Results: Active Mentoring was effective in increasing most types of engagement in activities, but there was no observed effect for social engagement. Mentor help also increased.

Conclusion: Active Mentoring was effective in eliciting support from mentors, and in increasing activity engagement of older adults with intellectual disability in mainstream community groups.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2788.2012.01625.x
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
13 Education
11 Medical And Health Sciences
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086592

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 9 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 10 Oct 2016, 09:19:20 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.