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Relations between symptom severity, illness perceptions, visceral sensitivity, coping strategies and well-being in irritable bowel syndrome guided by the common sense model of illness

Knowles, Simon R., Austin, David W., Sivanesan, Suresh, Tye-Din, Jason, Leung, Chris, Wilson, Jarrad, Castle, David, Kamm, Michael A., Macrae, Finlay and Hebbard, Geoff 2016, Relations between symptom severity, illness perceptions, visceral sensitivity, coping strategies and well-being in irritable bowel syndrome guided by the common sense model of illness, Psychology, health & medicine, vol. In Press, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1080/13548506.2016.1168932.

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Title Relations between symptom severity, illness perceptions, visceral sensitivity, coping strategies and well-being in irritable bowel syndrome guided by the common sense model of illness
Author(s) Knowles, Simon R.
Austin, David W.ORCID iD for Austin, David W. orcid.org/0000-0002-1296-3555
Sivanesan, Suresh
Tye-Din, Jason
Leung, Chris
Wilson, Jarrad
Castle, David
Kamm, Michael A.
Macrae, Finlay
Hebbard, Geoff
Journal name Psychology, health & medicine
Volume number In Press
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2016-04-04
ISSN 1354-8506
1465-3966
Keyword(s) Irritable Bowel Syndrome
psychological distress
quality of life
Summary Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a common condition affecting around 10-20% of the population and associated with poorer psychological well-being and quality of life. The aim of the current study was to explore the efficacy of the Common Sense Model (CSM) using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) in an IBS cohort. One hundred and thirty-one IBS patients (29 males, 102 females, mean age 38 years) participating in the IBSclinic.org.au pre-intervention assessment were included. Measures included IBS severity (Irritable Bowel Syndrome Severity Scoring System), coping patterns (Carver Brief COPE), visceral sensitivity (Visceral Sensitivity Index), illness perceptions (Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire), psychological distress (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale), and quality of life (IBS Quality of Life scale; IBS-QoL). Using SEM, a final model with an excellent fit was identified (χ(2) (8) = 11.91, p = .16, χ(2)/N = 1.49, CFI > .98, TLI > .96, SRMR < .05). Consistent with the CSM, Illness perceptions were significantly and directly influenced by IBS severity (β = .90, p < .001). Illness perceptions in turn directly influenced maladaptive coping (β = .40, p < .001) and visceral sensitivity (β = .70, p < .001). Maladaptive coping and visceral sensitivity were significantly associated with psychological distress (β = .55, p < .001; β = .22, p < .01) and IBS-QoL (β = -.28, p < .001; β = -.62, p < .001). Based on these findings, we argue that to augment the adverse impact of IBS severity on IBS-QoL and psychological distress, psychological interventions will be best to target the mediating psychological processes including illness beliefs, visceral sensitivity and maladaptive coping.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/13548506.2016.1168932
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1701 Psychology
1503 Business And Management
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Informa UK
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086621

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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