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Identifying educator behaviours for high quality verbal feedback in health professions education: literature review and expert refinement

Johnson, Christina E., Keating, Jennifer L., Boud, David J., Dalton, Megan, Kiegaldie, Debra, Hay, Margaret, McGrath, Barry, McKenzie, Wendy A., Nair, Kichu Balakrishnan R., Nestel, Debra, Palermo, Claire and Molloy, Elizabeth K. 2016, Identifying educator behaviours for high quality verbal feedback in health professions education: literature review and expert refinement, BMC medical education, vol. 16, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12909-016-0613-5.

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Title Identifying educator behaviours for high quality verbal feedback in health professions education: literature review and expert refinement
Author(s) Johnson, Christina E.
Keating, Jennifer L.
Boud, David J.
Dalton, Megan
Kiegaldie, Debra
Hay, Margaret
McGrath, Barry
McKenzie, Wendy A.
Nair, Kichu Balakrishnan R.
Nestel, Debra
Palermo, Claire
Molloy, Elizabeth K.
Journal name BMC medical education
Volume number 16
Article ID 96
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03-22
ISSN 1472-6920
Keyword(s) clinical practice
delphi process
educator behaviour
feedback
health professions education
delphi technique
education, medical
faculty, medical
formative feedback
humans
verbal behavior
Summary BACKGROUND: Health professions education is characterised by work-based learning and relies on effective verbal feedback. However the literature reports problems in feedback practice, including lack of both learner engagement and explicit strategies for improving performance. It is not clear what constitutes high quality, learner-centred feedback or how educators can promote it. We hoped to enhance feedback in clinical practice by distinguishing the elements of an educator's role in feedback considered to influence learner outcomes, then develop descriptions of observable educator behaviours that exemplify them. METHODS: An extensive literature review was conducted to identify i) information substantiating specific components of an educator's role in feedback asserted to have an important influence on learner outcomes and ii) verbal feedback instruments in health professions education, that may describe important educator activities in effective feedback. This information was used to construct a list of elements thought to be important in effective feedback. Based on these elements, descriptions of observable educator behaviours that represent effective feedback were developed and refined during three rounds of a Delphi process and a face-to-face meeting with experts across the health professions and education. RESULTS: The review identified more than 170 relevant articles (involving health professions, education, psychology and business literature) and ten verbal feedback instruments in health professions education (plus modified versions). Eighteen distinct elements of an educator's role in effective feedback were delineated. Twenty five descriptions of educator behaviours that align with the elements were ratified by the expert panel. CONCLUSIONS: This research clarifies the distinct elements of an educator's role in feedback considered to enhance learner outcomes. The corresponding set of observable educator behaviours aim to describe how an educator could engage, motivate and enable a learner to improve. This creates the foundation for developing a method to systematically evaluate the impact of verbal feedback on learner performance.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12909-016-0613-5
Field of Research 1302 Curriculum And Pedagogy
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086697

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Created: Mon, 10 Oct 2016, 11:22:33 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.