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A test of the theory of planned behavior to predict physical activity in an overweight/obese population sample of adolescents from Alberta, Canada

Plotnikoff, Ronald C., Lubans, David R., Costigan, Sarah A. and McCargar, Linda 2013, A test of the theory of planned behavior to predict physical activity in an overweight/obese population sample of adolescents from Alberta, Canada, Health education & behavior, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 415-425, doi: 10.1177/1090198112455642.

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Title A test of the theory of planned behavior to predict physical activity in an overweight/obese population sample of adolescents from Alberta, Canada
Author(s) Plotnikoff, Ronald C.
Lubans, David R.
Costigan, Sarah A.ORCID iD for Costigan, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0003-2566-3276
McCargar, Linda
Journal name Health education & behavior
Volume number 40
Issue number 4
Start page 415
End page 425
Total pages 11
Publisher Sage
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, Calif.
Publication date 2013-08-01
ISSN 1090-1981
1552-6127
Keyword(s) adolescents
obese
overweight
physical activity
theory of planned behavior
web-based survey
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Data Collection
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Intention
Internet
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity
Psychological Theory
Self Efficacy
Summary PURPOSE: To examine the utility of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) for explaining physical activity (PA) intention and behavior among a large population sample of overweight and obese adolescents (Alberta, Canada), using a web-based survey. Secondary objectives were to examine the mediating effects of the TPB constructs and moderating effects of weight status.

METHODS: A subsample of 427 overweight and 133 obese participants (n = 560), completed a self-administered web-based questionnaire on health and PA behaviors, including assessment of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control (PBC), and intention to participate in regular PA. Structural equation models were examined using AMOS 17.0.

RESULTS: Overall, 62% of the variance in intention was accounted for by attitude, subjective norm, and PBC; whereas 44% of the variance in PA behavior was explained by PBC and intention. When examining the TPB separately in overweight and obese subsamples, 66% and 56% of the variance for PA intention was explained for overweight and obese subsamples, respectively; and 38% and 56% of the variance in PA behavior were accounted for in the overweight and obese subsamples. Overall, attitude was the strongest predictor of PA intention, whereas PBC was the strongest predictor for PA behavior. Intention was not predictive of PA behavior.

CONCLUSIONS: These results provide partial support for the utility of TPB in explaining PA behavior in a sample of overweight and obese adolescents. In particular, strong associations regarding attitude and PBC were evident across each subsample. These findings have implications for tailoring PA programs in this population.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/1090198112455642
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
11 Medical And Health Sciences
13 Education
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Society for Public Health Education
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086810

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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