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Protocol for a randomized controlled study of Iyengar yoga for youth with irritable bowel syndrome

Evans, Subhadra, Cousins, Laura, Tsao, Jennie CI, Sternlieb, Beth and Zeltzer, Lonnie K 2011, Protocol for a randomized controlled study of Iyengar yoga for youth with irritable bowel syndrome, Trials, vol. 12, Article number: 15, pp. 1-19, doi: 10.1186/1745-6215-12-15.

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Title Protocol for a randomized controlled study of Iyengar yoga for youth with irritable bowel syndrome
Author(s) Evans, SubhadraORCID iD for Evans, Subhadra orcid.org/0000-0002-1898-0030
Cousins, Laura
Tsao, Jennie CI
Sternlieb, Beth
Zeltzer, Lonnie K
Journal name Trials
Volume number 12
Season Article number: 15
Start page 1
End page 19
Total pages 19
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011-01-18
ISSN 1745-6215
Keyword(s) Abdominal Pain
Adolescent
Adult
Autonomic Nervous System
Emotions
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Los Angeles
Male
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life
Research Design
Saliva
Spirituality
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Yoga
Young Adult
Summary INTRODUCTION: Irritable bowel syndrome affects as many as 14% of high school-aged students. Symptoms include discomfort in the abdomen, along with diarrhea and/or constipation and other gastroenterological symptoms that can significantly impact quality of life and daily functioning. Emotional stress appears to exacerbate irritable bowel syndrome symptoms suggesting that mind-body interventions reducing arousal may prove beneficial. For many sufferers, symptoms can be traced to childhood and adolescence, making the early manifestation of irritable bowel syndrome important to understand. The current study will focus on young people aged 14-26 years with irritable bowel syndrome. The study will test the potential benefits of Iyengar yoga on clinical symptoms, psychospiritual functioning and visceral sensitivity. Yoga is thought to bring physical, psychological and spiritual benefits to practitioners and has been associated with reduced stress and pain. Through its focus on restoration and use of props, Iyengar yoga is especially designed to decrease arousal and promote psychospiritual resources in physically compromised individuals. An extensive and standardized teacher-training program support Iyengar yoga's reliability and safety. It is hypothesized that yoga will be feasible with less than 20% attrition; and the yoga group will demonstrate significantly improved outcomes compared to controls, with physiological and psychospiritual mechanisms contributing to improvements.

METHODS/DESIGN: Sixty irritable bowel syndrome patients aged 14-26 will be randomly assigned to a standardized 6-week twice weekly Iyengar yoga group-based program or a wait-list usual care control group. The groups will be compared on the primary clinical outcomes of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, quality of life and global improvement at post-treatment and 2-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes will include visceral pain sensitivity assessed with a standardized laboratory task (water load task), functional disability and psychospiritual variables including catastrophizing, self-efficacy, mood, acceptance and mindfulness. Mechanisms of action involved in the proposed beneficial effects of yoga upon clinical outcomes will be explored, and include the mediating effects of visceral sensitivity, increased psychospiritual resources, regulated autonomic nervous system responses and regulated hormonal stress response assessed via salivary cortisol.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-12-15
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086927

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.