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Sociodemographic factors in a pediatric chronic pain clinic: the roles of age, sex and minority status in pain and health characteristics

Evans, Subhadra, Taub, Rebecca, Tsao, Jennie C.I., Meldrum, Marcia and Zeltzer, Lonnie K. 2010, Sociodemographic factors in a pediatric chronic pain clinic: the roles of age, sex and minority status in pain and health characteristics, Journal of pain management, vol. 3, no. 3, Article number : 7, pp. 273-281.

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Title Sociodemographic factors in a pediatric chronic pain clinic: the roles of age, sex and minority status in pain and health characteristics
Author(s) Evans, SubhadraORCID iD for Evans, Subhadra orcid.org/0000-0002-1898-0030
Taub, Rebecca
Tsao, Jennie C.I.
Meldrum, Marcia
Zeltzer, Lonnie K.
Journal name Journal of pain management
Volume number 3
Issue number 3
Season Article number : 7
Start page 273
End page 281
Total pages 9
Publisher Nova Science Publishers
Place of publication Hauppage, N.Y.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1939-5914
Keyword(s) chronic pain
pediatric
clinical cohort
differences
Summary Little is known about how sociodemographic factors relate to children's chronic pain. This paper describes the pain, health, and sociodemographic characteristics of a cohort of children presenting to an urban tertiary chronic pain clinic and documents the role of age, sex and minority status on pain-related characteristics. A multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Two hundred and nineteen patients and their parents were given questionnaire packets to fill out prior to their intake appointment which included demographic information, clinical information, Child Health Questionnaire - Parent Report, Functional Disability Index - Parent Report, Child Somatization Index - Parent Report, and a Pain Intensity Scale. Additional clinical information was obtained from patients' medical records via chart review. This clinical sample exhibited compromised functioning in a number of domains, including school attendance, bodily pain, and health compared to normative data. Patients also exhibited high levels of functional disability. Minority children evidenced decreased sleep, increased somatization, higher levels of functional disability, and increased pain intensity compared to Caucasians. Caucasians were more likely to endorse headaches than minorities, and girls were more likely than boys to present with fibromyalgia. Younger children reported better functioning than did teens. The results indicate that sociodemographic factors are significantly associated with several pain-related characteristics in children with chronic pain. Further research must address potential mechanisms of these relationships and applications for treatment.
Language eng
Field of Research 111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, Nova Science Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086935

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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