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Diet quality is associated with obesity and hypertension in Australian adults: a cross sectional study.

Livingstone, Katherine M and McNaughton, Sarah A 2016, Diet quality is associated with obesity and hypertension in Australian adults: a cross sectional study., BMC Public Health, vol. 16, 1037, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3714-5.

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Title Diet quality is associated with obesity and hypertension in Australian adults: a cross sectional study.
Author(s) Livingstone, Katherine MORCID iD for Livingstone, Katherine M orcid.org/0000-0002-9682-7541
McNaughton, Sarah AORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Journal name BMC Public Health
Volume number 16
Season 1037
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-10-01
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Adults
Diet quality
Hypertension
Obesity
Obesity-related hypertension
Summary BACKGROUND: Poor diet, characterized by a low diet quality score, has been associated with greater prevelence of obesity and hypertension. However, the evidence is inconsistent across diet quality scores and by sex. The aim was to investigate the relationship between diet quality and obesity and hypertension.

METHODS: Adults (n = 4908; age 45.2 ± 0.24 years) were included from the cross-sectional Australian Health Survey 2011-2013. Two 24-h dietary recalls were used to derive the dietary guideline index (DGI) and recommended food score (RFS). Logistic regression investigated relationships between diet quality score and odds ratio of obesity, hypertension and obesity-associated hypertension.

RESULTS: In the highest tertile of DGI, but not RFS, individuals were less likely to be obese (men: OR 0.64, CI: 0.45, 0.92, P-trend = 0.014; women: 0.68, 0.48, 0.96, P-trend = 0.025) and to have central adiposity (men: 0.68, 0.48, 0.97, P-trend = 0.030; women: 0.53, 0.37, 0.77, P-trend = 0.001) compared with the lowest tertile. Men, but not women, in the highest tertile of DGI and RFS were less likely to be hypertensive (DGI: 0.56, 0.37, 0.85, P-trend = 0.006; RFS: 0.62, 0.41, 0.94, P-trend = 0.021) compared with the lowest tertile. In men with obesity, but not normal weight men or women, those in the highest tertile of DGI were less likely to be hypertensive (0.53, 0.36, 0.78, P-trend = 0.001) compared with the highest tertile.

CONCLUSIONS: Higher diet quality, as estimated using DGI, was associated with lower odds ratio of obesity in men and women. Odds ratio of hypertension was lower in men, but not women, with a high diet quality score compared with a low score, while obesity-associated hypertension was only associated with diet quality score in men with obesity. Longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate whether diet quality predicts risk of obesity and hypertension.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3714-5
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30086983

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.