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Recommendations for dietary calcium intake and bone health: the role of health literacy

Hosking, S.M., Pasco, J.A., Hyde, N.K., Williams, L.J. and Brennan-Olsen, S.L. 2016, Recommendations for dietary calcium intake and bone health: the role of health literacy, Journal of nutrition & food sciences, vol. 6, no. 1, Article number : 1000452, pp. 1-3, doi: 10.4172/2155-9600.1000452.

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Title Recommendations for dietary calcium intake and bone health: the role of health literacy
Author(s) Hosking, S.M.
Pasco, J.A.ORCID iD for Pasco, J.A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Hyde, N.K.
Williams, L.J.
Brennan-Olsen, S.L.
Journal name Journal of nutrition & food sciences
Volume number 6
Issue number 1
Season Article number : 1000452
Start page 1
End page 3
Total pages 3
Publisher Omics Publishing Group
Place of publication Los Angeles, Calif.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2155-9600
Keyword(s) health literacy
dietary calcium intake
Osteoporosis
recommended daily intake
Summary Osteoporosis, a common disease of the skeleton, involves microarchitecturaldeterioration of the bone matrix and depletion of bonemineral; this results in an increased susceptibility to fracture [1]. Postfracture,there is a plethora of financial, personal and psychosocialoutcomes, including reduced mobility, impairment of daily activities,inability to work and loss of confidence [2,3]. A hip fracture has themost severe implications: one in five individuals die within the firstyear, while 60% of individuals who survive a hip fracture still requireassistance to walk one year later, and 33% are totally dependent or areadmitted to a nursing home [2,4]. Bone mass is an important predictorof osteoporosis, and future fracture risk [5], and calcium plays animportant role in normal growth, development and maintenance of theskeleton [6], including providing a dynamic store to maintain theintra- and extra-cellular calcium pools [7]. Calcium homeostasis isregulated by an integrated hormonal system that involves calcitonin,parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the PTH receptor, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and the vitamin D receptor [7,8], along withserum ionized calcium, and the calcium-sensing receptor [9]. Whenplasma concentrations of ionized calcium fall below optimal levels,bone resorption increases in order to restore the mineral equilibrium.
Language eng
DOI 10.4172/2155-9600.1000452
Field of Research 111103 Nutritional Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087256

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.