Establishing school university partnerships to teach science – Does what worked for us work for you?

Kenny, J., Hobbs, L., Speldewinde, C., Jones, M., Campbell, C., Gilbert, A., Chittleborough, G., Herbert, S. and Redman, C. 2015, Establishing school university partnerships to teach science – Does what worked for us work for you?, in ESERA 2015: Proceedings of the 11th Conference for the Science Education Research Association: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, European Science Education Research Association, [Helsinki, Finland], pp. 2029-2040.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Establishing school university partnerships to teach science – Does what worked for us work for you?
Author(s) Kenny, J.
Hobbs, L.ORCID iD for Hobbs, L. orcid.org/0000-0002-6898-8495
Speldewinde, C.
Jones, M.
Campbell, C.ORCID iD for Campbell, C. orcid.org/0000-0002-1373-9168
Gilbert, A.
Chittleborough, G.ORCID iD for Chittleborough, G. orcid.org/0000-0002-0919-1582
Herbert, S.ORCID iD for Herbert, S. orcid.org/0000-0001-5990-5099
Redman, C.
Conference name European Science Education Research Association. Conference (11th: 2015: Helsinki, Finland)
Conference location Helsinki, Finland
Conference dates 31 Aug. - 4 Sep. 2015
Title of proceedings ESERA 2015: Proceedings of the 11th Conference for the Science Education Research Association: Engaging learners for a sustainable future
Editor(s) Evagorou, M.
Michelini, M.
Publication date 2015
Start page 2029
End page 2040
Total pages 12
Publisher European Science Education Research Association
Place of publication [Helsinki, Finland]
Keyword(s) school-based science education
teacher educators
partnerships
Summary Concerns over the quality and amount of science teaching in Australian primary schools has led to a concentration of research on the methods of delivery of science education. There is a growing interest in both Australian and International contexts on building teacher knowledge and confidence to teach science, how science is taught at the primary school level and also how pre-service teachers are prepared to teach science. The Science Teacher Education Partnerships with Schools (STEPS) project is one response to these concerns. The STEPS project is a collaboration of five Australian universities that each independently set-up their own school-based partnership approaches with schools to deliver their science education programs. Each university aimed to provide pre-service teachers with the genuine experience of teaching science while being supported by university teaching staff. The project has drawn on feedback from pre-service teachers, teachers, principals and teacher educators involved at the five universities to examine the prevailing practices and led to the development of a set of tools and process, referred to as the Interpretive Framework (IF)(Hobbs et al. 2015). The IF describes how to create and maintain effective partnerships with schools, based on this research. This current paper reports on a survey conducted in 2014 which aimed to feedback from teacher educators across Australia to explore the extent to which school-based teaching opportunities in science for PSTs were in use across the country and to identify the range of approaches and theories driving their practices. Some respondents were followed up for interview and key factors were analysed and reported here. These data will be used to further refine the IF.
ISBN 9789515115416
Language eng
Field of Research 130103 Higher Education
130106 Secondary Education
Socio Economic Objective 930201 Pedagogy
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2015, ESERA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087260

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Education
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 408 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 13 Oct 2016, 08:18:11 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.