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Dietary recommendations for the prevention of depression

Opie, R. S., Itsiopoulos, C., Parletta, N., Sanchez-Villegas, A., Akbaraly, T. N., Ruusunen, A. and Jacka, F. N 2016, Dietary recommendations for the prevention of depression, Nutritional neuroscience, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1179/1476830515Y.0000000043.

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Title Dietary recommendations for the prevention of depression
Author(s) Opie, R. S.
Itsiopoulos, C.
Parletta, N.
Sanchez-Villegas, A.
Akbaraly, T. N.
Ruusunen, A.
Jacka, F. NORCID iD for Jacka, F. N orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Journal name Nutritional neuroscience
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-03-02
ISSN 1476-8305
Keyword(s) Depression
Diet
Mental disorder
Prevention
Summary BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder is a common, chronic condition that imposes a substantial burden of disability globally. As current treatments are estimated to address only one-third of the disease burden of depressive disorders, there is a need for new approaches to prevent depression or to delay its progression. While in its early stages, converging evidence from laboratory, population research, and clinical trials now suggests that dietary patterns and specific dietary factors may influence the risk for depression. However, largely as a result of the recency of the nutritional psychiatry field, there are currently no dietary recommendations for depression. AIM: The aim of this paper is to provide a set of practical dietary recommendations for the prevention of depression, based on the best available current evidence, in order to inform public health and clinical recommendations.
RESULTS: Five key dietary recommendations for the prevention of depression emerged from current published evidence. These comprise: (1) follow 'traditional' dietary patterns, such as the Mediterranean, Norwegian, or Japanese diet; (2) increase consumption of fruits, vegetables, legumes, wholegrain cereals, nuts, and seeds; (3) include a high consumption of foods rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids; (4) replace unhealthy foods with wholesome nutritious foods; (5) limit your intake of processed-foods, 'fast' foods, commercial bakery goods, and sweets.
CONCLUSION: Although there are a number of gaps in the scientific literature to date, existing evidence suggests that a combination of healthful dietary practices may reduce the risk of developing depression. It is imperative to remain mindful of any protective effects that are likely to come from the cumulative and synergic effect of nutrients that comprise the whole-diet, rather than from the effects of individual nutrients or single foods. As the body of evidence grows from controlled intervention studies on dietary patterns and depression, these recommendations should be modified accordingly.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1179/1476830515Y.0000000043
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, W. S. Maney & Son Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087354

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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