Mechanism of fat taste perception: association with diet and obesity

Liu, Dongli, Archer, Nicholas, Duesing, Konsta, Hannan, Garry and Keast, Russell 2016, Mechanism of fat taste perception: association with diet and obesity, Progress in lipd research, vol. 63, pp. 41-49, doi: 10.1016/j.plipres.2016.03.002.

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Title Mechanism of fat taste perception: association with diet and obesity
Author(s) Liu, Dongli
Archer, Nicholas
Duesing, Konsta
Hannan, Garry
Keast, RussellORCID iD for Keast, Russell orcid.org/0000-0003-2147-7687
Journal name Progress in lipd research
Volume number 63
Start page 41
End page 49
Total pages 9
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-07
ISSN 1873-2194
Keyword(s) Fat
Obesity
Taste perception
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Nutrition & Dietetics
BODY-MASS INDEX
PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS
TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS
MAMMALIAN TASTE
CD36 GENE
OROSENSORY DETECTION
ORAL-SENSITIVITY
GUT HORMONES
ACID CHEMORECEPTION
SIGNAL-TRANSDUCTION
Summary Energy homeostasis plays a significant role in food consumption and body weight regulation with fat intake being an area of particular interest due to its palatability and high energy density. Increasing evidence from humans and animal studies indicate the existence of a taste modality responsive to fat via its breakdown product fatty acids. These studies implicate multiple candidate receptors and ion channels for fatty acid taste detection, indicating a complex peripheral physiology that is currently not well understood. Additionally, a limited number of studies suggest a reduced ability to detect fatty acids is associated with obesity and a diet high in fat reduces an individual's ability to detect fatty acids. To support this, genetic variants within candidate fatty acid receptors are also associated with obesity reduced ability to detect fatty acids. Understanding oral peripheral fatty acid transduction mechanisms and the association with fat consumption may provide the basis of novel approaches to control development of obesity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.plipres.2016.03.002
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
0601 Biochemistry And Cell Biology
1101 Medical Biochemistry And Metabolomics
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087375

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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