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Examining the relationship between childhood health conditions and health service utilisation at school entry and subsequent academic performance in a large cohort of Australian children

Nasuuna, Esther, Santoro, Giuseppe, Kremer, Peter and de Silva, Andrea M. 2016, Examining the relationship between childhood health conditions and health service utilisation at school entry and subsequent academic performance in a large cohort of Australian children, Journal of paediatrics and child health, vol. 52, no. 7, pp. 750-758, doi: 10.1111/jpc.13183.

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Title Examining the relationship between childhood health conditions and health service utilisation at school entry and subsequent academic performance in a large cohort of Australian children
Author(s) Nasuuna, Esther
Santoro, Giuseppe
Kremer, Peter
de Silva, Andrea M.
Journal name Journal of paediatrics and child health
Volume number 52
Issue number 7
Start page 750
End page 758
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-07
ISSN 1440-1754
Keyword(s) academic performance
chronic health conditions
education
general paediatrics
international child health
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Pediatrics
CARE NEEDS
STUDENT PERFORMANCE
OUTCOMES
ASTHMA
DISEASE
IMPACT
ADHD
Summary AIM: Chronic health conditions are associated with poor academic outcomes. This study examines the relationship between health conditions, specialist health service utilisation and academic performance in Australian children.

METHODS: This was a quasi-longitudinal study where School Entrant Health Questionnaire (a survey tool with parent report on children's health) data for 24 678 children entering school in 2008 was matched with the 2011 National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). Linear and logistic regressions were used to examine associations between health conditions, use of a specialist health service and reading and numeracy scores.

RESULTS: The study comprised 24 678 children. Children with allergies, very low birth weight, developmental delay, diabetes, spina bifida, cystic fibrosis, birth abnormality, speech problems, intellectual disability and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder had lower numeracy scores than those without any of these conditions (P < 0.05). The same children had higher odds (1.2-5.8) of being at or below the national minimum standard for numeracy. Children with developmental delay, epilepsy, dental problems, speech, intellectual disabilities and low birth weight had lower reading scores than those without these conditions (P < 0.05) and had higher odds of being at (odds ratio: 1.3) or below (odds ratio: 3.7) the national minimum standard for reading. Children with health conditions who had ever accessed specialist health services did not differ in their academic performance from those that had not used specialist health services.

CONCLUSIONS: Some health conditions put children at risk of poorer academic performance, and interventions to prevent this such as appropriate support services in schools should be considered.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jpc.13183
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087399

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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