Using Butler to understand the multiplicity and variability of policy reception

Gowlett, Christina, Keddie, Amanda, Mills, Martin, Renshaw, Peter, Christie, Pam, Geelan, David and Monk, Sue 2015, Using Butler to understand the multiplicity and variability of policy reception, Journal of education policy, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 149-164, doi: 10.1080/02680939.2014.920924.

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Title Using Butler to understand the multiplicity and variability of policy reception
Author(s) Gowlett, Christina
Keddie, AmandaORCID iD for Keddie, Amanda orcid.org/0000-0001-6111-0615
Mills, Martin
Renshaw, Peter
Christie, Pam
Geelan, David
Monk, Sue
Journal name Journal of education policy
Volume number 30
Issue number 2
Start page 149
End page 164
Total pages 16
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0268-0939
1464-5106
Keyword(s) Butler
cultural intelligibility
policy enactment
policy reception
Summary Understanding how teachers make sense of education policy is important. We argue that an exploration of teacher reactions to policy requires an engagement with theory focused on the formation of ‘the subject’ since this form of theorisation addresses the creation of a seemingly coherent identity and attitude while acknowledging variation across different places and people. In this paper, we propose the utility of Butlerian ideas because of the focus on subjectivity that her work entails and the account she gives for social norms regulating people’s actions and attitudes. We use Butler’s stance on how ‘cultural intelligibility’ is formed to account for the complex, messy and sometimes contradictory ‘take up’ of curriculum policy by 10 teachers at a secondary school case study in Queensland, Australia. We use the phrase ‘policy reception’ to signify a particular theoretical line of thought we are forming with our application of Butlerian theory to the analysis of teacher attitudes toward curriculum policy, and to distinguish it from ‘policy interpretation’, ‘policy translation’ and ‘policy enactment’.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/02680939.2014.920924
Field of Research 160506 Education Policy
130302 Comparative and Cross-Cultural Education
1303 Specialist Studies In Education
1605 Policy And Administration
Socio Economic Objective 930501 Education and Training Systems Policies and Development
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087427

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Arts and Education
School of Education
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