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Optimising health literacy and access of service provision to community dwelling older people with diabetes receiving home nursing support

Goeman, Dianne, Conway, Sue, Norman, Ralph, Morley, Jo, Weerasuriya, Rona, Osborne, Richard H. and Beauchamp, Alison 2016, Optimising health literacy and access of service provision to community dwelling older people with diabetes receiving home nursing support, Journal of diabetes research, vol. 2016, Article ID : 2483263, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1155/2016/2483263.

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Title Optimising health literacy and access of service provision to community dwelling older people with diabetes receiving home nursing support
Author(s) Goeman, Dianne
Conway, Sue
Norman, Ralph
Morley, Jo
Weerasuriya, Rona
Osborne, Richard H.
Beauchamp, Alison
Journal name Journal of diabetes research
Volume number 2016
Season Article ID : 2483263
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Hindawi
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 2314-6753
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Medicine, Research & Experimental
Research & Experimental Medicine
QUESTIONNAIRE HLQ
TEACH-BACK
INFORMATION
EFFICACY
OUTCOMES
PROGRAM
Summary Background. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use information and services for good health. Among people with chronic conditions, health literacy requirements for effective self-management are high. The Optimising Health Literacy and Access (Ophelia) study engaged diverse organisations in the codesign of interventions involving the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) needs assessment, followed by development and evaluation of interventions addressing identified needs. This study reports the process and outcomes of one of the nine organisations, the Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS).

Methods. Participants were home nursing clients with diabetes. The intervention included tailored diabetes self-management education according to preferred learning style, a standardised diabetes education tool, resources, and teach-back method.

Results. Needs analysis of 113 quota-sampled clients showed difficulties managing health and finding and appraising health information. The service-wide diabetes education intervention was applied to 24 clients. The intervention was well received by clients and nurses. Positive impacts on clients' diabetes knowledge and behaviour were seen and nurses reported clear benefits to their practice.

Conclusion. A structured method that supports healthcare services to codesign interventions that respond to the health literacy needs of their clients can lead to evidence-informed, sustainable practice changes that support clients to better understand effective diabetes self-management.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2016/2483263
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087580

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.