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“Glossary Islands” as sites of the “abroad” in post-colonial literature: towards a new methodology for language and knowledge relations in Keri Hulme’s The Bone People and Melissa Lucashenko’s Mullumbimby

West, Patrick Leslie 2016, “Glossary Islands” as sites of the “abroad” in post-colonial literature: towards a new methodology for language and knowledge relations in Keri Hulme’s The Bone People and Melissa Lucashenko’s Mullumbimby, M/C Journal, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 1-1.

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Title “Glossary Islands” as sites of the “abroad” in post-colonial literature: towards a new methodology for language and knowledge relations in Keri Hulme’s The Bone People and Melissa Lucashenko’s Mullumbimby
Formatted title “Glossary Islands” as sites of the “abroad” in post-colonial literature: towards a new methodology for language and knowledge relations in Keri Hulme’s The Bone People and Melissa Lucashenko’s Mullumbimby
Author(s) West, Patrick LeslieORCID iD for West, Patrick Leslie orcid.org/0000-0003-4957-4294
Journal name M/C Journal
Volume number 19
Issue number 5
Start page 1
End page 1
Total pages 1
Publisher M/C - Media and Culture
Place of publication Australia
Publication date 2016-10
ISSN 1441-2616
Keyword(s) Post-Colonial
Language
English
Australia
Indigenous
New Zealand
Summary The publication of Melissa Lucashenko’s Mullumbimby in 2013 drew attention once more to the issue of how post-colonial scholars might best engage with English-language literary texts also containing a glossary of Indigenous words. This issue emerged first with the publication of Keri Hulme’s The Bone People in 1984. This article argues that, to date, scholars like Simon During and Eve Vincent have perpetuated a binary either/or approach to the interpretation of these glossaries. The result of this approach has been that either the pre-colonial Indigenous language or the colonial/post-colonizing English language has been privileged as the locus of linguistic power in the text. One problem with this approach is that it does not adequately represent the complex historical, cultural and political circumstances of post-colonial and multi-cultural nations like Australia (setting of Mullumbimby) and New Zealand (setting of The Bone People) as these link to matters of language. Another problem is that this binary approach restrains a close reading of the differences between different types of such glossaries, and of the nuanced relationship of a glossary to the text it accompanies. In place of this approach, this article proposes a new methodology that works with Elizabeth M. DeLoughrey’s notion of “tidalectics” as a way of reading island literatures. The neologism “glossary islands” allows another way into considering the function of glossaries in islandic literary texts like Lucashenko’s and Hulme’s. The post-colonial connection between islands and glossaries lies in the fact that they are each an intensified site of knowledge.
Language eng
Field of Research 190299 Film, Television and Digital Media not elsewhere classified
200199 Communication and Media Studies not elsewhere classified
200299 Cultural Studies not elsewhere classified
200501 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Literature
Socio Economic Objective 950203 Languages and Literature
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Patrick Leslie West
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087618

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.