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The impact of a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages on health and health care costs: a modelling study

Veerman, J Lennert, Sacks, Gary, Antonopoulos, Nicole and Martin, Jane 2016, The impact of a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages on health and health care costs: a modelling study, PLoS one, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0151460.

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Title The impact of a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages on health and health care costs: a modelling study
Author(s) Veerman, J Lennert
Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Antonopoulos, Nicole
Martin, Jane
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 11
Issue number 4
Article ID e0151460
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2016-04-13
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Adult
Australia
Carbonated Beverages
Cost of Illness
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Models, Economic
Overweight
Sweetening Agents
Taxes
Summary This paper aims to estimate the consequences of an additional 20% tax on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on health and health care expenditure. Participants were adult (aged > = 20) Australians alive in 2010, who were modelled over their remaining lifetime. We used lifetable-based epidemiological modelling to examine the potential impact of a 20% valoric tax on SSBs on total lifetime disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), incidence, prevalence, and mortality of obesity-related disease, and health care expenditure. Over the lifetime of adult Australian alive in 2010, seemingly modest estimated changes in average body mass as a result of the SSB tax translated to gains of 112,000 health-adjusted life years for men (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 73,000–155,000) and 56,000 (95% UI: 36,000–76,000) for women, and a reduction in overall health care expenditure of AUD609 million (95% UI: 368 million– 870 million). The tax is estimated to reduce the number of new type 2 diabetes cases by approximately 800 per year. Twenty-five years after the introduction of the tax, there would be 4,400 fewer prevalent cases of heart disease and 1,100 fewer persons living with the consequences of stroke, and an estimated 1606 extra people would be alive as a result of the tax. The tax would generate an estimated AUD400 million in revenue each year. Governments should consider increasing the tax on sugared drinks. This would improve population health, reduce health care costs, as well as bring in direct revenue.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0151460
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, Veerman et al
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087733

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.