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Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet and effects on cognition in adults: a qualitative evaluation and systematic review of longitudinal and prospective trials

Hardman, Roy J., Kennedy, Greg, Macpherson, Helen, Scholey, Andrew B. and Pipingas, Andrew 2016, Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet and effects on cognition in adults: a qualitative evaluation and systematic review of longitudinal and prospective trials, Frontiers in nutrition, vol. 3, Article number : 22, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3389/fnut.2016.00022.

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Title Adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet and effects on cognition in adults: a qualitative evaluation and systematic review of longitudinal and prospective trials
Author(s) Hardman, Roy J.
Kennedy, Greg
Macpherson, Helen
Scholey, Andrew B.
Pipingas, Andrew
Journal name Frontiers in nutrition
Volume number 3
Season Article number : 22
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2016
Keyword(s) Mediterranean diet
clinical trials
cognition
nutrition
Summary The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) involves substantial intake of fruits, vegetables, and fish, and a lower consumption of dairy, red meat, and sugars. Over the past 15 years, much empirical evidence supports the suggestion that a MedDiet may be beneficial with respect to reducing the incidence of cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and dementia. A number of cross-sectional studies that have examined the impact of MedDiet on cognition have yielded largely positive results. The objective of this review is to evaluate longitudinal and prospective trials to gain an understanding of how a MedDiet may impact cognitive processes over time. The included studies were aimed at improving cognition or minimizing of cognitive decline. Studies reviewed included assessments of dietary status using either a food frequency questionnaire or a food diary assessment. Eighteen articles meeting our inclusion criteria were subjected to systematic review. These revealed that higher adherence to a MedDiet is associated with slower rates of cognitive decline, reduced conversion to Alzheimer's disease, and improvements in cognitive function. The specific cognitive domains that were found to benefit with improved Mediterranean Diet Score were memory (delayed recognition, long-term, and working memory), executive function, and visual constructs. The current review has also considered a number of methodological issues in making recommendations for future research. The utilization of a dietary pattern, such as the MedDiet, will be essential as part of the armamentarium to maintain quality of life and reduce the potential social and economic burden of dementia.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnut.2016.00022
Field of Research 111102 Dietetics and Nutrigenomics
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087845

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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