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Implementation of the Kids-CAT in clinical settings: a newly developed computer-adaptive test to facilitate the assessment of patient-reported outcomes of children and adolescents in clinical practice in Germany

Barthel, D, Fischer, KI, Nolte, S, Otto, C, Meyrose, AK, Reisinger, S, Dabs, M, Thyen, U, Klein, M, Muehlan, H, Ankermann, T, Walter, O, Rose, M and Ravens-Sieberer, U 2016, Implementation of the Kids-CAT in clinical settings: a newly developed computer-adaptive test to facilitate the assessment of patient-reported outcomes of children and adolescents in clinical practice in Germany, Quality of life research, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 585-594, doi: 10.1007/s11136-015-1219-9.

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Title Implementation of the Kids-CAT in clinical settings: a newly developed computer-adaptive test to facilitate the assessment of patient-reported outcomes of children and adolescents in clinical practice in Germany
Author(s) Barthel, D
Fischer, KI
Nolte, S
Otto, C
Meyrose, AK
Reisinger, S
Dabs, M
Thyen, U
Klein, M
Muehlan, H
Ankermann, T
Walter, O
Rose, M
Ravens-Sieberer, U
Journal name Quality of life research
Volume number 25
Issue number 3
Start page 585
End page 594
Total pages 10
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Cham, Switzerland
Publication date 2016-03
ISSN 0962-9343
1573-2649
Keyword(s) computer-adaptive test
quality of life
electronic patient-reported outcomes
user acceptance
pediatrics
clinical practice
Summary Purpose: To describe the implementation process of a computer-adaptive test (CAT) for measuring health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children and adolescents in two pediatric clinics in Germany. The study focuses on the feasibility and user experience with the Kids-CAT, particularly the patients’ experience with the tool and the pediatricians’ experience with the Kids-CAT Report.

Methods: The Kids-CAT was completed by 312 children and adolescents with asthma, diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis. The test was applied during four clinical visits over a 1-year period. A feedback report with the test results was made available to the pediatricians. To assess both feasibility and acceptability, a multimethod research design was used. To assess the patients’ experience with the tool, the children and adolescents completed a questionnaire. To assess the clinicians’ experience, two focus groups were conducted with eight pediatricians.

Results:
The children and adolescents indicated that the Kids-CAT was easy to complete. All pediatricians reported that the Kids-CAT was straightforward and easy to understand and integrate into clinical practice; they also expressed that routine implementation of the tool would be desirable and that the report was a valuable source of information, facilitating the assessment of self-reported HRQoL of their patients.

Conclusions: The Kids-CAT was considered an efficient and valuable tool for assessing HRQoL in children and adolescents. The Kids-CAT Report promises to be a useful adjunct to standard clinical care with the potential to improve patient–physician communication, enabling pediatricians to evaluate and monitor their young patients’ self-reported HRQoL.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11136-015-1219-9
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30087883

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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