Does gender moderate the relationship between polydrug use and sexual risk-taking among Australian secondary school students under 16 years of age?

Chan, Gary C.K., Kelly, Adrian B., Hides, Leanne, Quinn, Catherine and Williams, Joanne W. 2016, Does gender moderate the relationship between polydrug use and sexual risk-taking among Australian secondary school students under 16 years of age?, Drug and alcohol review, vol. 35, no. 6, pp. 750-754, doi: 10.1111/dar.12394.

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Title Does gender moderate the relationship between polydrug use and sexual risk-taking among Australian secondary school students under 16 years of age?
Author(s) Chan, Gary C.K.
Kelly, Adrian B.
Hides, Leanne
Quinn, Catherine
Williams, Joanne W.ORCID iD for Williams, Joanne W. orcid.org/0000-0002-5633-1592
Journal name Drug and alcohol review
Volume number 35
Issue number 6
Start page 750
End page 754
Total pages 5
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-11
ISSN 1465-3362
Keyword(s) adolescent
alcohol
drug
sex
unprotected sex
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Substance Abuse
SUBSTANCE USE
ALCOHOL-USE
BEHAVIOR
ADOLESCENTS
DISORDERS
Summary INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: This study examines the association of alcohol and polydrug use with risky sexual behaviour in adolescents under 16 years of age and if this association differs by gender.

DESIGN AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 5412 secondary school students under 16 years of age from Victoria, Australia. Participants completed an anonymous and confidential survey during class time. The key measures were having had sex before legal age of consent (16 years), unprotected sex before 16 (no condom) and latent-class derived alcohol and polydrug use variables based on alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, inhalants and other illegal drug use in the past month.

RESULTS: There were 7.52% and 2.55% of adolescents who reported having sex and having unprotected sex before 16 years of age, respectively. After adjusting for antisocial behaviours, peers' drug use and family and school risk factors, girls were less likely to have unprotected sex (odds ratio = 0.31, P = 0.003). However, the interaction of being female and polydrug use (odds ratio = 4.52, P = 0.004) was significant, indicating that girls who engaged in polydrug use were at higher risk of having unprotected sex. For boys, the effect of polydrug use was non-significant (odds ratio = 1.44, P = 0.310).

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: For girls, polydrug use was significantly associated with unprotected sex after adjusting for a range of risk factors, and this relationship was non-significant for boys. Future prevention programs for adolescent risky sexual behaviour and polydrug use might benefit from a tailored approach to gender differences. [Chan GCK, Kelly AB, Hides L, Quinn C, Williams JW. Does gender moderate the relationship between polydrug use and sexual risk-taking among Australian secondary school students under 16 years of age?
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/dar.12394
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920414 Substance Abuse
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088022

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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