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The colour of paternity: extra-pair paternity in the wild Gouldian finch does not appear to be driven by genetic incompatibility between morphs

Bolton, P. E., Rollins, L. A., Brazill-Boast, J., Kim, K-W., Burke, T. and Griffith, S. C. 2017, The colour of paternity: extra-pair paternity in the wild Gouldian finch does not appear to be driven by genetic incompatibility between morphs, Journal of evolutionary biology, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 174-190, doi: 10.1111/jeb.12997.

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Title The colour of paternity: extra-pair paternity in the wild Gouldian finch does not appear to be driven by genetic incompatibility between morphs
Author(s) Bolton, P. E.
Rollins, L. A.ORCID iD for Rollins, L. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-3279-7005
Brazill-Boast, J.
Kim, K-W.
Burke, T.
Griffith, S. C.
Journal name Journal of evolutionary biology
Volume number 30
Issue number 1
Start page 174
End page 190
Total pages 17
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-01
ISSN 1010-061X
1420-9101
Keyword(s) colour polymorphism
domestication
Estrildidae
mate choice
polyandry
post-zygotic isolation
Summary In socially monogamous species, individuals can use extra-pair paternity and offspring sex allocation as adaptive strategies to ameliorate costs of genetic incompatibility with their partner. Previous studies on domesticated Gouldian finches (Erythrura gouldiae) demonstrated a genetic incompatibility between head colour morphs, the effects of which are more severe in female offspring. Domesticated females use differential sex allocation, and extra-pair paternity with males of compatible head colour, to reduce fitness costs associated with incompatibility in mixed-morph pairings. However, laboratory studies are an oversimplification of the complex ecological factors experienced in the wild, and may only reflect the biology of a domesticated species. This study aimed to examine the patterns of parentage and sex-ratio bias with respect to colour pairing combinations in a wild population of the Gouldian finch. We utilized a novel PCR assay that allowed us to genotype the morph of offspring before the morph phenotype develops, and to explore bias in morph paternity and selection at the nest. Contrary to previous findings in the laboratory, we found no effect of pairing combinations on patterns of extra-pair paternity, offspring sex ratio, or selection on morphs in nestlings. In the wild, the effect of morph incompatibility is likely much smaller, or absent, than was observed in the domesticated birds. Furthermore, the previously studied domesticated population is genetically differentiated from the wild population, consistent with the effects of domestication. It is possible that the domestication process fostered the emergence (or enhancement) of incompatibility between colour morphs previously demonstrated in the laboratory.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/jeb.12997
Field of Research 060303 Biological Adaptation
060803 Animal Developmental and Reproductive Biology
0603 Evolutionary Biology
0608 Zoology
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, European Society For Evolutionary Biology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088255

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