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Influence of fuel-borne oxygen on European stationary cycle: diesel engine performance and emissions with a special emphasis on particulate and NO emissions

Nabi, Md Nurun, Zare, Ali, Hossain, Farhad M., Rahman, Md Mostafizur, Bodisco, Timothy A., Ristovski, Zoran D. and Brown, Richard J. 2016, Influence of fuel-borne oxygen on European stationary cycle: diesel engine performance and emissions with a special emphasis on particulate and NO emissions, Energy conversion and management, vol. 127, pp. 187-198, doi: 10.1016/j.enconman.2016.09.010.

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Title Influence of fuel-borne oxygen on European stationary cycle: diesel engine performance and emissions with a special emphasis on particulate and NO emissions
Author(s) Nabi, Md Nurun
Zare, Ali
Hossain, Farhad M.
Rahman, Md Mostafizur
Bodisco, Timothy A.
Ristovski, Zoran D.
Brown, Richard J.
Journal name Energy conversion and management
Volume number 127
Start page 187
End page 198
Total pages 12
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-11-01
ISSN 0196-8904
1879-2227
Keyword(s) fuel-borne oxygen
engine performance
diesel particles
NO emissions
Summary Exploration of sustainable fuels and their influence on reductions in diesel emissions are nowadays a challenge for the engine and fuel researchers. This study investigates the role of fuel-borne oxygen on engine performance and exhaust emissions with a special emphasis on diesel particulate and nitric oxide (NO) emissions. A number of oxygenated-blends were prepared with waste cooking biodiesel as a base oxygenated fuel. Triacetin, a derivative from transesterified biodiesel was chosen for its high oxygen content and superior fuel properties. The experimental campaign was conducted with a 6-cylinder, common rail turbocharged diesel engine equipped with highly precise instruments for nano and other size particles and other emissions. All experiments were performed in accordance with European Stationary Cycle (ESC 13-mode). A commercial diesel was chosen as a reference fuel with 0% oxygen and five other oxygenated blends having a range of 6.02–14.2% oxygen were prepared. The experimental results revealed that the oxygenated blends having higher a percentage of fuel-borne oxygen reduced particulate matter (PM), particle number (PN), unburned hydrocarbon (UBHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions to a significantly low level with a slight penalty of NO emissions. The main target of this study was to effectively utilise triacetin as an additive for waste cooking biodiesel and suppress emissions without deteriorating engine performance. The key finding of this investigation is the significant reductions in both particle mass and number emissions simultaneously without worsening engine performance with triacetin-biodiesel blends. Reductions in both particle mass and number emissions with a cost-effective additive would be a new dimension for the fuel and engine researchers to effectively use triacetin as an emission suppressor in the future.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.enconman.2016.09.010
Field of Research 090201 Automotive Combustion and Fuel Engineering (incl Alternative/Renewable Fuels)
Socio Economic Objective 970109 Expanding Knowledge in Engineering
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID LP110200158
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Free to Read? No
Free to Read Start Date 2018-11-02
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088282

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Education
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