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Artefacts and distributed cognition: towards a new perspective on science learning

Xu, Lihua and Clarke, David 2007, Artefacts and distributed cognition: towards a new perspective on science learning, in NARST 2007 : Proceedings of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching 2007 Annual Meeting : Restructuring Science Education Through Research, National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST), Reston, Va., pp. 1-10.

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Title Artefacts and distributed cognition: towards a new perspective on science learning
Author(s) Xu, LihuaORCID iD for Xu, Lihua orcid.org/0000-0003-3292-1296
Clarke, David
Conference name National Association for Research in Science Teaching. Annual Meeting (2007 : New Orleans, Louisiana)
Conference location New Orleans, Louisiana
Conference dates 15-18 Apr. 2007
Title of proceedings NARST 2007 : Proceedings of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching 2007 Annual Meeting : Restructuring Science Education Through Research
Publication date 2007
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST)
Place of publication Reston, Va.
Summary Our purpose in this paper is to propose distributed cognition (Hollan, Hutchins, & Kirsh, 1999; Hutchins, 1991, 1995) as a useful perspective on science learning. Deviating from the individualistic cognitive model, a significant shift in this perspective is its conceptualization of learning as constituted in both internal and external resources. Therefore, the research focus is on cognitive systems that include both participants and their environment, and on the public space of interaction. In this paper, we first elaborate the epistemological groundings of distributed cognition and introduce an analytical approach that was developed to study two videotaped science lessons. Using the detailed analysis of the empirical data, we explicate some key assumptions underlying traditional educational thinking and further reframe these assumptions from the perspective of distributed cognition. This paper opens up the possibility of employing distributed cognition as an explanatory framework to study learning in science classrooms and also serves as an invitation for studies that could further enrich the theory of distributed cognition.
Language eng
Field of Research 130208 Mathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type X Not reportable
Copyright notice ©2007, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088305

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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