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Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores

Ripple, William J., Newsome, Thomas M., Wolf, Christopher, Dirzo, Rodolfo, Everatt, Kristoffer T., Galetti, Mauro, Hayward, Matt W., Kerley, Graham I. H., Levi, Taal, Lindsey, Peter A., Macdonald, David W., Malhi, Yadvinder, Painter, Luke E., Sandom, Christopher J., Terborgh, John and Van Valkenburgh, Blaire 2015, Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores, Science advances, vol. 1, no. 4, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.1400103.

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Title Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores
Author(s) Ripple, William J.
Newsome, Thomas M.ORCID iD for Newsome, Thomas M. orcid.org/0000-0003-3457-3256
Wolf, Christopher
Dirzo, Rodolfo
Everatt, Kristoffer T.
Galetti, Mauro
Hayward, Matt W.
Kerley, Graham I. H.
Levi, Taal
Lindsey, Peter A.
Macdonald, David W.
Malhi, Yadvinder
Painter, Luke E.
Sandom, Christopher J.
Terborgh, John
Van Valkenburgh, Blaire
Journal name Science advances
Volume number 1
Issue number 4
Article ID e1400103
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publication date 2015-05-01
ISSN 2375-2548
Keyword(s) large herbivores
endangerment
trophic cascades
extinction
hunting
habitat loss
defaunation
megafauna
Summary Large wild herbivores are crucial to ecosystems and human societies. We highlight the 74 largest terrestrial herbivore species on Earth (body mass≥100 kg), the threats they face, their important and often overlooked ecosystem effects, and the conservation efforts needed to save them and their predators from extinction. Large herbivores aregenerally facing dramatic population declines and range contractions, such that ~60% are threatened with extinction. Nearly all threatened species are in developing countries, where major threats include hunting, land-use change, and resource depression by livestock. Loss of large herbivores can have cascading effects on other species including large carnivores, scavengers, mesoherbivores, small mammals, and ecological processes involving vegetation, hydrology, nutrient cycling, and fire regimes. The rate of large herbivore decline suggests that ever-largerswaths of the world will soon lack many of the vital ecological services these animals provide, resulting in enormous ecological and social costs.
Language eng
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1400103
Field of Research 060806 Animal Physiological Ecology
Socio Economic Objective 960805 Flora
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088344

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.