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Museums, games, and historical imagination: student responses to a games-based experience at the Australian National Maritime Museum

Rowan, Leonie, Townend, Geraldine, Beavis, Catherine, Kelly, Lynda and Fletcher, Jeffrey 2016, Museums, games, and historical imagination: student responses to a games-based experience at the Australian National Maritime Museum, Digital culture and education, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 169-187.

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Title Museums, games, and historical imagination: student responses to a games-based experience at the Australian National Maritime Museum
Author(s) Rowan, Leonie
Townend, Geraldine
Beavis, CatherineORCID iD for Beavis, Catherine orcid.org/0000-0002-8835-0309
Kelly, Lynda
Fletcher, Jeffrey
Journal name Digital culture and education
Volume number 8
Issue number 3
Start page 169
End page 187
Total pages 19
Publisher Digital Culture & Education
Place of publication [Australia]
Publication date 2016-07-28
ISSN 1836-8301
Keyword(s) digital games
historical imagination
learning
curriculum
museums
Summary Digital games feature prominently in discussions concerning the ways museums might reimagine themselves—and best serve their audiences—in an increasingly digital age. Questions are increasingly asked about the opportunities various games might provide to foster historical imagination, and, in this process, contribute to the curation, construction and dissemination of knowledge: goals central to the work of modern museums. This paper reports on the experiences and perceptions of three groups of year 9 students (aged 14-15) as they engaged with one purpose built digital game—called The Voyage— at the Australian National Maritime Museum in 2015. The researchers sought students’ feedback on the strengths, weakness and possibilities associated with using games in museum contexts (rather than at home, or at school). In presenting students’ perspectives and their associated recommendations, the paper provides vital end-user input into considerations about how museums might maximize the potential of digital games, to enhance historical awareness and understanding, build links to formal curriculum, and strengthen partnerships between schools and museums.
Language eng
Field of Research 130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
130205 Humanities and Social Sciences Curriculum and Pedagogy (excl Economics, Business and Management)
1005 Communications Technologies
2001 Communication And Media Studies
Socio Economic Objective 930102 Learner and Learning Processes
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©[2016, The Authors]
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088456

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.