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Exploring psychometric properties of the SF-6D, a preference-based health-related quality of life measure, in the context of spinal cord injury

Engel, Lidia, Bryan, Stirling, Evers, Silva MAA, Dirksen, Carmen D, Noonan, Vanessa K and Whitehurst, David GT 2014, Exploring psychometric properties of the SF-6D, a preference-based health-related quality of life measure, in the context of spinal cord injury, Quality of life research, vol. 23, no. 8, pp. 2383-2393, doi: 10.1007/s11136-014-0677-9.

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Title Exploring psychometric properties of the SF-6D, a preference-based health-related quality of life measure, in the context of spinal cord injury
Author(s) Engel, LidiaORCID iD for Engel, Lidia orcid.org/0000-0002-7959-3149
Bryan, Stirling
Evers, Silva MAA
Dirksen, Carmen D
Noonan, Vanessa K
Whitehurst, David GT
Journal name Quality of life research
Volume number 23
Issue number 8
Start page 2383
End page 2393
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2014-10
ISSN 1573-2649
Keyword(s) Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Spinal Cord Injuries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Summary PURPOSE: The validity of the SF-6D, a preference-based measure of health-related quality of life, is not well explored in the context of spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of this analysis was to assess appropriate measurement properties of the SF-6D in a sample of individuals living with SCI. METHODS: Longitudinal data from the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry were used. Responses to the 36-item short-form health survey were transformed into SF-6D utility scores. We investigated practicality, floor and ceiling effects, and responsiveness to change. Responsiveness to change was explored using three different anchors that reflected changes in self-reported health, functional independence, and life satisfaction. Discriminative validity was assessed by ten a priori defined hypotheses, with a distinction made between 'strong' and 'weak' hypotheses. RESULTS: Three hundred and fifty-eight individuals with SCI were included in this analysis. Practicality was deemed acceptable based on a completion rate of 94%. The SF-6D showed low responsiveness to detect important health changes over time, and differences in responsiveness were found between individuals with paraplegia and tetraplegia. All five strong hypotheses and three weak hypotheses were confirmed. CONCLUSION: The SF-6D demonstrated good practicality and discriminative validity in this sample. The failure to detect self-reported and clinically important health changes requires further consideration. Comparative performance of the SF-6D (i.e., how the SF-6D performs against other preference-based measures) is unknown in the SCI context and requires further research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11136-014-0677-9
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Springer International Publishing Switzerland
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088464

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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