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More active pre-school children have better motor competence at school starting age: an observational cohort study

Barnett, Lisa, Salmon, Jo and Hesketh, Kylie D 2016, More active pre-school children have better motor competence at school starting age: an observational cohort study, BMC public health, vol. 16, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/s12889-016-3742-1.

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Title More active pre-school children have better motor competence at school starting age: an observational cohort study
Author(s) Barnett, LisaORCID iD for Barnett, Lisa orcid.org/0000-0002-9731-625X
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Hesketh, Kylie DORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 16
Article ID 1068
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-10-10
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Early childhood
Longitudinal, fundamental movement skill
Object control skill
Physical activity
Toddlers
Summary BACKGROUND: Almost half of young children do not achieve minimum recommendations of 60 daily minutes in physical activity. Physical activity is potentially an important determinant of the development of motor competence in children. This study is one of very few longitudinal studies in this area and the first to investigate early childhood physical activity as a predictor of subsequent motor skill competence.

METHODS: Children were assessed as part of the Melbourne InFANT Program longitudinal cohort study at 19 months, 3.5 years and 5 years. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (accelerometry) was assessed at each time point. At age 5, children were also assessed in actual (Test of Gross Motor Development-2) and perceived motor competence (Pictorial Scale of Perceived Movement Skill Competence). General linear models were performed with all 12 skills (six object control and six locomotor skills), both actual and perceived, at age 5 as the respective outcome variables. Predictor variables alternated between MVPA at 19 months, 3.5 years and 5 years.

RESULTS: Based on standardized TGMD-2 scores most children were average or below in their skill level at age 5. MVPA at 19 months was not a predictor of actual or perceived skill at age 5. MVPA at 3.5 years was associated with actual locomotor skill (B = 0.073, p = 0.033) and perceived total skill at 5 years of age (B = 0.059, p = 0.044). MVPA was not a predictor of actual or perceived object control skill at any age.

CONCLUSION: Parents and preschool staff should be informed that more time in MVPA as a preschool child contributes to locomotor skill and to perceptions of skill ability in a child of school starting age. Understanding this relationship will assist in intervention development.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3742-1
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC 425801
NHMRC 1008879
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088485

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.