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An aggravated trajectory of depression and anxiety co-morbid with Hepatitis C: a within-groups study of 61 Australian outpatients.

Stewart, Benjamin J R, Turnbull, Deborah, Mikocka-Walus, Antonina, Harley, Hugh and Andrews, Jane M 2015, An aggravated trajectory of depression and anxiety co-morbid with Hepatitis C: a within-groups study of 61 Australian outpatients., Clinical practice and epidemiology in mental health, vol. 11, pp. 174-179, doi: 10.2174/1745017901511010174.

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Title An aggravated trajectory of depression and anxiety co-morbid with Hepatitis C: a within-groups study of 61 Australian outpatients.
Author(s) Stewart, Benjamin J R
Turnbull, Deborah
Mikocka-Walus, AntoninaORCID iD for Mikocka-Walus, Antonina orcid.org/0000-0003-4864-3956
Harley, Hugh
Andrews, Jane M
Journal name Clinical practice and epidemiology in mental health
Volume number 11
Start page 174
End page 179
Total pages 6
Publisher Bentham Open
Place of publication Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
Publication date 2015
Keyword(s) Anxiety
depression
hepatitis C
prognosis
trajectory.
Summary BACKGROUND: This study aimed to explore the course of depression and anxiety in chronic hepatitis C patients. METHODS:   Data were combined from two studies: (1) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores in 395 consecutive Australian outpatients from 2006 to 2010 formed the baseline measurement; and (2) Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS) scores in a survey of a sub-sample of these patients in 2011 formed the follow-up measurement. After converting DASS to HADS scores, changes in symptom scores and rates of case-ness (≥8), and predictors of follow-up symptoms were assessed. RESULTS:   Follow-up data were available for 61 patients (70.5% male) whose age ranged from 24.5 to 74.6 years (M=45.6). The time to follow-up ranged from 20.7 to 61.9 months (M=43.8). Baseline rates of depression (32.8%) and anxiety (44.3%) increased to 62.3% and 67.2%, respectively. These findings were confirmed, independent of the conversion, by comparing baseline HADS and follow-up DASS scores with British community norms. Baseline anxiety and younger age predicted depression, while baseline anxiety, high school non-completion, and single relationship status predicted anxiety. CONCLUSION:  This study demonstrated a worsening trajectory of depression and anxiety. Further controlled and prospective research in a larger sample is required to confirm these findings.
Language eng
DOI 10.2174/1745017901511010174
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, Bentham Open
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088631

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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