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The effects of a designer music intervention on patients' anxiety, pain, and experience of colonoscopy: a short report on a pilot study.

Martindale, Fiona, Mikocka-Walus, Antonina, Walus, Bartlomiej P, Keage, Hannah and Andrews, Jane M 2014, The effects of a designer music intervention on patients' anxiety, pain, and experience of colonoscopy: a short report on a pilot study., Gastroenterology nursing, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. 338-342, doi: 10.1097/SGA.0000000000000066.

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Title The effects of a designer music intervention on patients' anxiety, pain, and experience of colonoscopy: a short report on a pilot study.
Author(s) Martindale, Fiona
Mikocka-Walus, AntoninaORCID iD for Mikocka-Walus, Antonina orcid.org/0000-0003-4864-3956
Walus, Bartlomiej P
Keage, Hannah
Andrews, Jane M
Journal name Gastroenterology nursing
Volume number 37
Issue number 5
Start page 338
End page 342
Total pages 5
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Baltimore, Md.
Publication date 2014-09
ISSN 1538-9766
Keyword(s) Anxiety
Colonoscopy
Conscious sedation
Music therapy
Pain management
Summary There is a controversy on whether listening to music before or during colonoscopy reduces anxiety and pain and improves satisfaction and compliance with the procedure. This study aimed to establish whether specifically designed music significantly affects anxiety, pain, and experience associated with colonoscopy. In this semirandomized controlled study, 34 patients undergoing a colonoscopy were provided with either muted headphones (n = 17) or headphones playing the investigator-selected music (n = 17) for 10 minutes before and during colonoscopy. Anxiety, pain, sedation dose, and overall experience were measured using quantitative measures and scales. Participants' state anxiety decreased over time (P < .001). However, music did not significantly reduce anxiety (P = .441), pain scores (P = .313), or midazolam (P = .327) or fentanyl doses (P = .295). Despite these findings, 100% of the music group indicated that they would want music if they were to repeat the procedure, as compared with only 50% of those in the nonmusic group wanting to wear muted headphones. Although no significant effects of music on pain, anxiety, and sedation were found, a clear preference for music was expressed, therefore warranting further research on this subject.
Language eng
DOI 10.1097/SGA.0000000000000066
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088646

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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