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Scientific ethics

Lim, Kieran F. 2016, Scientific ethics, Chemistry in Australia, vol. 2016, no. April, pp. 38-38.

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Title Scientific ethics
Author(s) Lim, Kieran F.ORCID iD for Lim, Kieran F. orcid.org/0000-0001-5355-8030
Journal name Chemistry in Australia
Volume number 2016
Issue number April
Start page 38
End page 38
Total pages 1
Publisher Royal Australian Chemical Institute
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2016-04
ISSN 0314-4240
1839-2539
Keyword(s) chemical education
chemistry education
science education
ethics
Summary Scientific ethics is and should be part of a science education (Chemistry in Australia, February 2014 issue, page 38). The Australian Curriculum implies ethical practice as early as year 2 when collecting and recording observations, and explicitly discussing ethical considerations from as early as year 3, in which students are expected to learn that science knowledge helps people to understand the effect of their actions, and in particular, considering how materials including solids and liquids affect the environment in different ways, and deciding what characteristics make a material a pollutant. As students progress through various year levels, this becomes more involved, for example at year 7, they learn that solutions to contemporary issues that are found using science and technology, may impact on other areas of society and may involve ethical considerations. At tertiary level, students are also expected to have an awareness of the ethical requirements that are appropriate for the discipline. Professional organisations, like the RACI, have long had a Code of Ethics (By-Law 13), and more employers are also introducing formal or informal codes: for example, the Victorian government requires that all public sector employees uphold the following values: responsiveness, integrity, impartiality, accountability, respect, leadership, and human rights.
Language eng
Field of Research 130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Socio Economic Objective 930102 Learner and Learning Processes
HERDC Research category C3 Non-refereed articles in a professional journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Royal Australian Chemical Institute
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088699

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.