Genetic analysis along an invasion pathway reveals endemic cryptic taxa, but a single species with little population structure in the introduced range

Hill, Matthew P., Hoffmann, Ary A., Umina, Paul A., Cheng, Xuan and Miller, Adam D. 2016, Genetic analysis along an invasion pathway reveals endemic cryptic taxa, but a single species with little population structure in the introduced range, Diversity and distributions, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 57-72, doi: 10.1111/ddi.12385.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Genetic analysis along an invasion pathway reveals endemic cryptic taxa, but a single species with little population structure in the introduced range
Author(s) Hill, Matthew P.
Hoffmann, Ary A.
Umina, Paul A.
Cheng, Xuan
Miller, Adam D.ORCID iD for Miller, Adam D. orcid.org/0000-0002-1632-7206
Journal name Diversity and distributions
Volume number 22
Issue number 1
Start page 57
End page 72
Total pages 16
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2016-01
ISSN 1366-9516
1472-4642
Keyword(s) biogeography
biological invasions
cryptic species
Halotydeus destructor
population genetics
Summary The invasion pathways of pest arthropods can be traced using genetic tools to develop an understanding of the processes that have shaped successful invasions and to inform both pest management and conservation strategies in their non-native and native ranges, respectively. The redlegged earth mite, Halotydeus destructor, is a major economic pest in Australia, successfully establishing and spreading after arrival from South Africa more than 100 years ago. Halotydeus destructor has recently expanded its range and evolved resistance to numerous pesticides in Australia, raising questions around its origin and spread. Location: South Africa and Australia. Methods: We sampled H. destructor populations in South Africa and Australia and developed a microsatellite marker library. We then examined genetic variation using mtDNA and microsatellite markers across both native and invasive ranges to determine endemic genetic diversity within South Africa, identify the likely origin of invasive populations and test genetic divergence across Australia. Results: The data show that H. destructor comprises a cryptic species complex in South Africa, with putative climatic/host plant associations that may correspond to regional variation. A lineage similar to that found near Cape Town has spread throughout Western and eastern Australia, where populations remain genetically similar. Main conclusions: Tracing the invasion pathway of this economically important pest revealed cryptic lineages in South Africa which points to the need for a taxonomic revision. The absence of significant genetic structure across the wide invasive range of H. destructor within Australia has implications for the development (and spread) of pesticide resistance and also points to recent local adaptation in physiological traits.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/ddi.12385
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
060408 Genomics
060808 Invertebrate Biology
070199 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management not elsewhere classified
070308 Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 820599 Winter Grains and Oilseeds not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, John Wiley & Sons
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088761

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 261 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 14 Nov 2016, 11:12:48 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.