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Strong genetic structure corresponds to small-scale geographic breaks in the Australian alpine grasshopper Kosciuscola tristis

Slatyer, Rachel A., Nash, Michael A., Miller, Adam D., Endo, Yoshinori, Umbers, Kate D. L. and Hoffmann, Ary A. 2014, Strong genetic structure corresponds to small-scale geographic breaks in the Australian alpine grasshopper Kosciuscola tristis, BMC evolutionary biology, vol. 14, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/s12862-014-0204-1.

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Title Strong genetic structure corresponds to small-scale geographic breaks in the Australian alpine grasshopper Kosciuscola tristis
Formatted title Strong genetic structure corresponds to small-scale geographic breaks in the Australian alpine grasshopper Kosciuscola tristis
Author(s) Slatyer, Rachel A.
Nash, Michael A.
Miller, Adam D.ORCID iD for Miller, Adam D. orcid.org/0000-0002-1632-7206
Endo, Yoshinori
Umbers, Kate D. L.
Hoffmann, Ary A.
Journal name BMC evolutionary biology
Volume number 14
Article ID 204
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1471-2148
Keyword(s) Australian alps
grasshopper
kosciuscola tristis
phylogeography
population genetics
alpine
Summary BACKGROUND: Mountain landscapes are topographically complex, creating discontinuous 'islands' of alpine and sub-alpine habitat with a dynamic history. Changing climatic conditions drive their expansion and contraction, leaving signatures on the genetic structure of their flora and fauna. Australia's high country covers a small, highly fragmented area. Although the area is thought to have experienced periods of relative continuity during Pleistocene glacial periods, small-scale studies suggest deep lineage divergence across low-elevation gaps. Using both DNA sequence data and microsatellite markers, we tested the hypothesis that genetic partitioning reflects observable geographic structuring across Australia's mainland high country, in the widespread alpine grasshopper Kosciuscola tristis (Sjösted).

RESULTS: We found broadly congruent patterns of regional structure between the DNA sequence and microsatellite datasets, corresponding to strong divergence among isolated mountain regions. Small and isolated mountains in the south of the range were particularly distinct, with well-supported divergence corresponding to climate cycles during the late Pliocene and Pleistocene. We found mixed support, however, for divergence among other mountain regions. Interestingly, within areas of largely contiguous alpine and sub-alpine habitat around Mt Kosciuszko, microsatellite data suggested significant population structure, accompanied by a strong signature of isolation-by-distance.

CONCLUSIONS: Consistent patterns of strong lineage divergence among different molecular datasets indicate genetic breaks between populations inhabiting geographically distinct mountain regions. Three primary phylogeographic groups were evident in the highly fragmented Victorian high country, while within-region structure detected with microsatellites may reflect more recent population isolation. Despite the small area of Australia's alpine and sub-alpine habitats, their low topographic relief and lack of extensive glaciation, divergence among populations was on the same scale as that detected in much more extensive Northern hemisphere mountain systems. The processes driving divergence in the Australian mountains might therefore differ from their Northern hemisphere counterparts.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12862-014-0204-1
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
060302 Biogeography and Phylogeography
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
0603 Evolutionary Biology
0604 Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 969999 Environment not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088765

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.