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Critically low levels of genetic diversity in fragmented populations of the endangered Glenelg spiny freshwater crayfish Euastacus bispinosus

Miller, Adam D., Sweeney, Oisin F., Whiterod, Nick S., Van Rooyen, Anthony R., Hammer, Michael and Weeks, Andrew R. 2014, Critically low levels of genetic diversity in fragmented populations of the endangered Glenelg spiny freshwater crayfish Euastacus bispinosus, Endangered species research, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 43-55, doi: 10.3354/esr00609.

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Title Critically low levels of genetic diversity in fragmented populations of the endangered Glenelg spiny freshwater crayfish Euastacus bispinosus
Author(s) Miller, Adam D.
Sweeney, Oisin F.
Whiterod, Nick S.
Van Rooyen, Anthony R.
Hammer, Michael
Weeks, Andrew R.
Journal name Endangered species research
Volume number 25
Issue number 1
Start page 43
End page 55
Total pages 13
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1863-5407
1613-4796
Keyword(s) population genetics
gene flow
genetic diversity
species conservation
habitat protection/restoration
translocation
inbreeding
Summary The Glenelg spiny freshwater crayfish Euastacus bispinosus is a large endangered freshwater invertebrate of southeastern Australia that has suffered major population declines over the last century. Disjunct populations in the state of South Australia are in a particularly critical condition, restricted to a few isolated rising-spring habitats and in an ongoing state of decline. We assessed genetic diversity and gene flow within E. bispinosus across its current range using allele frequencies from 11 nuclear microsatellite loci and DNA sequence data from a single mitochon -drial locus (cytochrome oxidase subunit I). Populations were characterized by low levels of genetic diversity and found to be highly structured, with gene flow restricted both within and across catchments, highlighting the species' vulnerability to further habitat fragmentation and the importance of managing environmental threats on local scales across its current natural range. South Australian populations were characterized by critically low levels of genetic diversity generally, highlighting their potential vulnerability to localized extinction. Holistic conservation efforts are necessary to conserve populations, including local habitat management and, potentially, translocations to increase genetic diversity and evolutionary potential, and reduce possible inbreeding effects and the threat of extinction.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/esr00609
Field of Research 060204 Freshwater Ecology
060302 Biogeography and Phylogeography
050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 960807 Fresh
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Inter-Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088767

Document type: Journal Article
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Centre for Integrative Ecology
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