The development of 10 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers through next generation sequencing and a preliminary population genetic analysis for the endangered Glenelg spiny crayfish, Euastacus bispinosus

Miller, Adam D, Van Rooyen, Anthony, Sweeney, Oisin F, Whiterod, Nick S and Weeks, Andrew R 2013, The development of 10 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers through next generation sequencing and a preliminary population genetic analysis for the endangered Glenelg spiny crayfish, Euastacus bispinosus, Molecular biology reports, vol. 40, no. 7, pp. 4415-4419, doi: 10.1007/s11033-013-2531-5.

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Title The development of 10 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers through next generation sequencing and a preliminary population genetic analysis for the endangered Glenelg spiny crayfish, Euastacus bispinosus
Author(s) Miller, Adam DORCID iD for Miller, Adam D orcid.org/0000-0002-1632-7206
Van Rooyen, Anthony
Sweeney, Oisin F
Whiterod, Nick S
Weeks, Andrew R
Journal name Molecular biology reports
Volume number 40
Issue number 7
Start page 4415
End page 4419
Total pages 5
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2013-07
ISSN 0301-4851
1573-4978
Keyword(s) Euastacus bispinosus
Microsatellite library development
Next generation DNA sequencing
Genetic diversity
Species conservation
Summary The Glenelg spiny crayfish, Euastacus bispinosus, is an iconic freshwater invertebrate of south eastern Australia and listed as 'endangered' under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, and 'vulnerable' under the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List. The species has suffered major population declines as a result of over-fishing, low environmental flows, the introduction of invasive fish species and habitat degradation. In order to develop an effective conservation strategy, patterns of gene flow, genetic structure and genetic diversity across the species distribution need to be clearly understood. In this study we develop a suite of polymorphic microsatellite markers by next generation sequencing. A total of 15 polymorphic loci were identified and 10 characterized using 22 individuals from the lower Glenelg River. We observed low to moderate genetic variation across most loci (mean number of alleles per locus = 2.80; mean expected heterozygosity = 0.36) with no evidence of individual loci deviating significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Marker independence was confirmed with tests for linkage disequilibrium, and analyses indicated no evidence of null alleles across loci. Individuals from two additional sites (Crawford River, Victoria; Ewens Ponds Conservation Park, South Australia) were genotyped at all 10 loci and a preliminary investigation of genetic diversity and population structure was undertaken. Analyses indicate high levels of genetic differentiation among sample locations (F ST = 0.49), while the Ewens Ponds population is genetically homogeneous, indicating a likely small founder group and ongoing inbreeding. Management actions will be needed to restore genetic diversity in this and possibly other at risk populations. These markers will provide a valuable resource for future population genetic assessments so that an effective framework can be developed for implementing conservation strategies for E. bispinosus.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11033-013-2531-5
Field of Research 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity
060204 Freshwater Ecology
060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Socio Economic Objective 960506 Ecosystem Assessment and Management of Fresh
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088771

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