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Acceptability of psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and self-directed therapies in Australians living with chronic hepatitis C.

Stewart, Benjamin J R, Turnbull, Deborah, Mikocka-Walus, Antonina, Harley, Hugh A J and Andrews, Jane M 2013, Acceptability of psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and self-directed therapies in Australians living with chronic hepatitis C., Journal of clinical psychology in medical settings, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 427-439, doi: 10.1007/s10880-012-9339-7.

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Title Acceptability of psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and self-directed therapies in Australians living with chronic hepatitis C.
Author(s) Stewart, Benjamin J R
Turnbull, Deborah
Mikocka-Walus, AntoninaORCID iD for Mikocka-Walus, Antonina orcid.org/0000-0003-4864-3956
Harley, Hugh A J
Andrews, Jane M
Journal name Journal of clinical psychology in medical settings
Volume number 20
Issue number 4
Start page 427
End page 439
Total pages 13
Publisher Springer
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2013-12
ISSN 1573-3572
Keyword(s) Hepatitis C
Acceptability
Mental health
Psychotherapy
Pharmacotherapy
Summary Despite the prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), treatment is under-researched. Patient preferences are likely to affect treatment uptake, adherence, and success. Thus, the acceptability of psychological supports was explored. A postal survey of Australian CHC outpatients of the Royal Adelaide Hospital and online survey of Australians living with CHC was conducted, assessing demographic and disease-related variables, psychosocial characteristics, past experience with psychological support, and psychological support acceptability. The final sample of 156 patients (58 % male) had significantly worse depression, anxiety, stress, and social support than norms. The most acceptable support type was individual psychotherapy (83 %), followed by bibliotherapy (61 %), pharmacotherapy (56 %), online therapy (45 %), and group psychotherapy (37 %). The most prominent predictor of support acceptability was satisfaction with past use. While individual psychotherapy acceptability was encouragingly high, potentially less costly modalities including group psychotherapy or online therapy may be hampered by low acceptability, the reasons for which need to be further explored.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s10880-012-9339-7
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088826

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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