The intergenerational transmission of problem gambling: the mediating role of parental psychopathology

Dowling, N.A., Shandley, K., Oldenhof, E., Youssef, G.J., Thomas, S.A., Frydenberg, E. and Jackson, A.C. 2016, The intergenerational transmission of problem gambling: the mediating role of parental psychopathology, Addictive behaviors, vol. 59, pp. 12-17, doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.03.002.

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Title The intergenerational transmission of problem gambling: the mediating role of parental psychopathology
Author(s) Dowling, N.A.ORCID iD for Dowling, N.A. orcid.org/0000-0001-8592-2407
Shandley, K.
Oldenhof, E.
Youssef, G.J.ORCID iD for Youssef, G.J. orcid.org/0000-0002-6178-4895
Thomas, S.A.
Frydenberg, E.
Jackson, A.C.
Journal name Addictive behaviors
Volume number 59
Start page 12
End page 17
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2016-08
ISSN 0306-4603
1873-6327
Keyword(s) problem gambling
psychopathology
drug use
problem drinking
parents
family
Summary The present study investigated the intergenerational transmission of problem gambling and the potential mediating role of parental psychopathology (problem drinking, drug use problems, and mental health issues). The study comprised 3953 participants (1938 males, 2015 females) recruited from a large-scale Australian community telephone survey of adults retrospectively reporting on parental problem gambling and psychopathology during their childhood. Overall, 4.0% [95%CI 3.0, 5.0] (n=157) of participants reported paternal problem gambling and 1.7% [95%CI 1.0, 2.0] (n=68) reported maternal problem gambling. Compared to their peers, participants reporting paternal problem gambling were 5.1 times more likely to be moderate risk gamblers and 10.7 times more likely to be problem gamblers. Participants reporting maternal problem gambling were 1.7 times more likely to be moderate risk gamblers and 10.6 times more likely to be problem gamblers. The results revealed that the relationships between paternal-and-participant and maternal-and-participant problem gambling were significant, but that only the relationship between paternal-and-participant problem gambling remained statistically significant after controlling for maternal problem gambling and sociodemographic factors. Paternal problem drinking and maternal drug use problems partially mediated the relationship between paternal-and-participant problem gambling, and fully mediated the relationship between maternal-and-participant problem gambling. In contrast, parental mental health issues failed to significantly mediate the transmission of gambling problems by either parent. When parental problem gambling was the mediator, there was full mediation of the effect between parental psychopathology and offspring problem gambling for fathers but not mothers. Overall, the study highlights the vulnerability of children from problem gambling households and suggests that it would be of value to target prevention and intervention efforts towards this cohort.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2016.03.002
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30088885

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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