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Achieving growth in NAPLAN: characteristics of successful schools

Muir, Ttracey, Livy, Sharyn, Herbert, Sandra and Callingham, Rosemary 2016, Achieving growth in NAPLAN: characteristics of successful schools, in AARE 2016 : Transforming educational research : Proceedings of the Conference for the Australian Association for Research in Education : Transforming Education Research, AARE, [Melbourne, Vic.], pp. 1-12.

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Title Achieving growth in NAPLAN: characteristics of successful schools
Author(s) Muir, Ttracey
Livy, Sharyn
Herbert, SandraORCID iD for Herbert, Sandra orcid.org/0000-0001-5990-5099
Callingham, Rosemary
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education. Conference (2016 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 27 Nov - 1 Dec 2016
Title of proceedings AARE 2016 : Transforming educational research : Proceedings of the Conference for the Australian Association for Research in Education : Transforming Education Research
Editor(s) Baguley, M.
Publication date 2016
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher AARE
Place of publication [Melbourne, Vic.]
Summary Since 2008, Australian students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 have been assessed through the National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). In 2015, the Office of the Chief Scientist commissioned a study into the processes used by schools that demonstrated successful outcomes in NAPLAN numeracy. A team of researchers across Australia conducted a total of 55 case studies in order to identify practices and policies that were consistent between successful schools. Data were gathered through surveys, classroom observations and interviews conducted with school leaders, teachers, students, and parents. Overall findings indicated there were a number of characteristics that were common to schools who achieved sustained growth in NAPLAN results. These characteristics included the development and implementation of policies that specifically supported numeracy learning and teaching, use of a variety of data sources to develop and refine mathematics teaching programs, team planning, strong numeracy leadership and a consistent school approach to teaching mathematics. This paper presents the findings from three case study schools as illustrative examples of how the identified characteristics were enacted in practice. The study has particular implications for policy makers and school leaders who may be seeking ways to develop consistent and effective mathematical practices in their own schools.
Language eng
Field of Research 130208 Mathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 930403 School/Institution Policies and Development
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
ERA Research output type E Conference publication
Copyright notice ©2016, AARE
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089107

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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Created: Thu, 08 Dec 2016, 13:22:15 EST

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