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Antidepressants and inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review

Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A, Turnbull, Deborah A, Moulding, Nicole T, Wilson, Ian G, Andrews, Jane M and Holtmann, Gerald J 2006, Antidepressants and inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review, Clinical practice and epidemiology in health, vol. 2, Article number: 24, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/1745-0179-2-24.

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Title Antidepressants and inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review
Author(s) Mikocka-Walus, Antonina AORCID iD for Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A orcid.org/0000-0003-4864-3956
Turnbull, Deborah A
Moulding, Nicole T
Wilson, Ian G
Andrews, Jane M
Holtmann, Gerald J
Journal name Clinical practice and epidemiology in health
Volume number 2
Season Article number: 24
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2006
ISSN 1745-0179
Summary Background
A number of studies have suggested a link between the patient's psyche and the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although pharmacotherapy with antidepressants has not been widely explored, some investigators have proposed that treating psychological co-morbidities with antidepressants may help to control disease activity. To date a systematic analysis of the available studies assessing the efficacy of antidepressants for the control of somatic symptoms in IBD patients has not been performed.

Methods

We searched electronic databases, without any language restriction. All relevant papers issued after 1990 were examined.

Results

12 relevant publications were identified. All of them referred to non-randomised studies. Antidepressants reported in these publications included paroxetine, bupropion, amitriptyline, phenelzine, and mirtazapine. In 10 articles, paroxetine, bupropion, and phenelzine were suggested to be effective for treating both psychological and somatic symptoms in patients suffering from IBD. Amitriptyline was found ineffective for treating somatic symptoms of IBD. Mirtazapine was not recommended for IBD patients.

Conclusion
Although most of reviewed papers suggest a beneficial effect of treatment with antidepressants in patients with IBD, due to the lack of reliable data, it is impossible to judge the efficacy of antidepressants in IBD. Properly designed trials are justified and needed based upon the available uncontrolled data.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1745-0179-2-24
Field of Research 110307 Gastroenterology and Hepatology
110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
1103 Clinical Sciences
1701 Psychology
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920105 Digestive System Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2006, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089167

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.