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"It doesn't do any harm, but patients feel better": a qualitative exploratory study on gastroenterologists' perspectives on the role of antidepressants in inflammatory bowel disease

Mikocka-Walus, Antonina, Turnbull, Deborah A., Moulding, Nicole T., Wilson, Ian G., Andrews, Jane M. and Holtmann, Gerald J. 2007, "It doesn't do any harm, but patients feel better": a qualitative exploratory study on gastroenterologists' perspectives on the role of antidepressants in inflammatory bowel disease, BMC gastroenterology, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1186/1471-230X-7-38.

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Title "It doesn't do any harm, but patients feel better": a qualitative exploratory study on gastroenterologists' perspectives on the role of antidepressants in inflammatory bowel disease
Author(s) Mikocka-Walus, Antonina
Turnbull, Deborah A.
Moulding, Nicole T.
Wilson, Ian G.
Andrews, Jane M.
Holtmann, Gerald J.
Journal name BMC gastroenterology
Volume number 24
Issue number 7
Article ID 38
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2007
ISSN 1471-230X
Summary Background: Interest in psychological factors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)has increased in recent years. It has even been proposed that treating psychological co-morbiditieswith antidepressants may control disease activity and improve quality of life. Despite this, there isno data on gastroenterologists' attitudes to, and experiences with, antidepressant therapy inpatients with IBD.Methods: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 gastroenterologists associated withmetropolitan teaching hospitals. Qualitative content analysis was used to examine their responses.Results: Seventy-eight percent of gastroenterologists had treated IBD patients withantidepressants for pain, depression and/or anxiety, and insomnia. Antidepressants were reportedto be useful in improving psychosocial well-being, quality of life, and self-management of the diseaseby patients. However, in this group of gastroenterologists, there appears to be skepticism towardspsychological disorders themselves or antidepressant therapy having a central role in either thecausation of IBD or its clinical course. Nevertheless, these gastroenterologists were receptive tothe idea of conducting a trial of the role of antidepressants in IBD.Conclusion: While the majority of specialists have treated IBD patients with antidepressants,there is considerable skepticism with regard to efficacy of antidepressive therapy or the role ofpsychological factors in the outcome of IBD patients.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-230X-7-38
Field of Research 110307 Gastroenterology and Hepatology
110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
1103 Clinical Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920105 Digestive System Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2007, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30089176

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.